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Can a Septorhinoplasty Address Deviated Septum, Breathing, and Fix the Bridge all at Once?

hi! I have a deviated septum & will be getting a septoplasty to improve my breathing. but I also don't like the shape of my nose & was thinking of getting a rhinoplasty added onto the procedure. the septoplasty will be completely covered by insurance, but I was wondering how much out of pocket I would have to pay for the additional rhinoplasty. I heard that it is less expensive if you get it done all at once. please give your expertise on the additional cost, thankyou (:

Doctor Answers (11)

Can a Septorhinoplasty Address Deviated Septum, Breathing, and Fix the Bridge all at Once?

+1

  No, a Septoplasty will reduce crooked sections of the nasal septum that's insdie the nose.  The nasal bridge is comprised of nasal bone and cartilage that sits atop the center divider (nasal septum).  The bone and cartiolage will be removed, with a Rhinoplasty, reducing the nasal bridge and would not be affected by a Septoplasty alone.  The exception, to this rule is when too much septum is removed causing a nasal collapse...which obviously should be avoided.  Be sure that your Rhinoplasty Surgeon understands and follows the proper aesthetics of facial (and nasal) beauty for the creation of a naturally, mnore attractive nose.  


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Septoplasty & rhinoplasty to address multiple concerns

+1

A septoplasty and a rhinoplasty can certainly be done at the same time, but patients will have to pay for the cosmetic portion of the procedure.  The cosmetic portion of the procedure (rhinoplasty) takes 2-3 times longer than the functional component.  The charge for a rhinoplasty is approximately $7000, which includes the operating room, anesthesia, and the surgeon’s fee for performing the procedure.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Septoplasty and rhinoplasty can usually accomplish all cosmetic and functional issues.

+1

Dear Kaity123;

No reason not to have those procedures done at once.  It seems you have the right reason to have that done, particularly since you have trouble breathing.  Speaking of breathing, besides straightening the deviated septum, be sure to ask your surgeon about turbinate reduction.  Enlarged turbinates are frequently a co-conspirator with the nasal septum in causing diminished airflow through the nose.

Typically when one combines a functional septorhinoplasty - with or without turbinate reduction - and rhinoplasty, the hospital, surgery center, or doctor’s surgical facility will prorate the amount of time and cost attributed to the functional and cosmetic surgeries. Then, the insurance company can be billed fairly for its portion of the time spent on the surgery.  It is not proper to ask an insurance company to pay for the purely cosmetic rhinoplasty part, as you recognize.  At your cosmetic surgery consultation with a nose specialist, ask for a complete breakdown of costs, including what percentage your responsibility is and what the office expects the insurance company to pay. 

A conscientious office will inquire with your insurance  whether the functional component, such as a septoplasty and turbinate reduction, are covered, and hopefully also get some dollar amount of the payment for those procedures. 

Good luck!

Robert Kotler, MD, FACS
Facial Plastic Surgeon
Author, SECRETS OF A BEVERLY HILLS COSMETIC SURGEON
Author, THE ESSENTIAL COSMETIC SURGERY COMPANION

Robert Kotler, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

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Septoplasty and Rhinoplasty can be combined and it makes sense to do it

+1

The rhinoplasty procedure can be combined with septoplasty. Septoplasty is the procedure designed to improve your nasal airways  and should definitely address your breathing problems. It all makes sense to proceed with both procedures and have one anesthesia and recovery time. The procedure takes about 2 hours on average for the experienced surgeon. You will wear the external splint for one week after the surgery and the internal splint for two weeks. The cost will vary depending on the surgeon, location and the complexity of the procedure but typically you save some money if you combine these procedures

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Functional and cosmetic septorhinoplasty together

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When considering nasal surgery it is critical to consider both the functional and cosmetic aspects of the nose that need to be addressed. Often times, changing the appearance of the nose requires maneuvers that ensure structural support of the nose at the same time. If at all possible it is beneficial not only financially but surgically to combine functional and cosmetic rhinoplasty in order to get the best outcome and avoid future nasal surgery in the future.

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Cosmetic and Functional Nasal procedures best performed together

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The internal and external nasal structures are intimately related and functional concerns should always be considered when undergoing a cosmetic nasal procedure.  I recommend performing functional and cosmetic work together when at all possible not so much for the cost savings (though it does save some money) as for the better result.  It is important that your surgeon is experienced in both functional and cosmetic nasal surgery.

Mark Beaty, MD
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Septoplasty and Cosmetic Rhinoplasty in Same Operation

+1

I strongly feel that cosmetic and functional problems can and should be corrected during the same operation. A better result will be achieved because all parts of the nose are intimately connected. The patient will need only one operation and the total out of pocket expense will be less

Richard W. Fleming, MD
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Rhinoplasty with Septoplasty

+1

If you have both a deviated septum with obstucted nasal breathing and a desire for cosmetic rhinoplasty, I feel that addressing both at the same time is ideal. Not only will your total out of pocket cost likely be less if your insurance covers the septoplasty, but often your rhinoplasty result will be better if the septum is also corrected (a deviated septum often impacts the external appearance of the nose).  You want to be sure that your surgeon is experienced in both aspects of the surgery. Otolaryngologists/Facial Plastic Surgeons are well trained in both functional and cosmetic nasal surgery.

James Bartels, MD
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Septoplasty and rhinoplasty

+1

Septoplasty and rhinoplasty should be done together if indicated. It always sounds nice to use your insurance for the septoplasty and hope to save money. Sometimes this works out and sometimes not so do your homework carefully. The reason for this is that when patients use their insurance there is almost always a copay or deductible applied for the surgeon, hospital and anesthesia. Sometimes the sum of these copays added to even the "discounted" rhinoplasty price is greater then the all cash global fee which I charge for the entire procedure.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
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Septoplasty and Simultaneous Rhinoplasty

+1

Combining a septoplasty and rhinoplasty is not only possible, it is preferred.  There is often some modest cost savings if combined and insurance pays for the septoplasy.  The main reason to combine the procedures is surgical.  Some of the incisions are the same.  Moreover, a rhinoplasty often involves the use of grafts.  The septum is a great source for such grafting, if needed.

David Alessi, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.