Can I Get Sclerotherapy on Breast After Augmentation?

I recently underwent breast augmentation surgery. It has left me with large, blue/green, hulk-like veins running through my breasts. They're so unattractive! Is it possible to have sclerotherapy without risk of popping the implant? Is it safe? If I require future implant surgery, will the lack of vein hinder healing?

Doctor Answers (2)

Sclerotherapy of the breast

+1

This should not be a problem, but breasts are not legs. Don't use the normal large vein sclerosants like STS or Morrhuate. If you do, you may end up with permanent brown stains in your skin. Glycerine and 1% Poidocanol (Asclera) are kinder to the tissues if there is a problem. Consider a test spot before you treat your whole breast>


Oshkosh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Sclerotherapy for breast veins after augmentation?

+1

Depending on the size of the vessels, sclerotherapy is indeed possible and safe from the standpoint of your implants (your implants are way deep compared to these surface vessels). However, most of these vessels are normal, and many may actually be too big for safe sclerotherapy.

Ask your surgeon to show you your pre-operative photos; these (normal) vessels are already there, but may show a bit more after augmentation.

I would recommend an in-person evaluation by an expert in sclerotherapy before saying this is appropriate or not. Future surgery is not a concern, but bruising, discoloration (long-term), and possible blistering and scarring ARE sclerotherapy risks that need to be seriously considered.

I have been performing sclerotherapy for the past 32 years (since my intern year in Surgery at the Mayo Clinic, where I was trained by two of the world's experts in sclerotherapy), and say that only to inform you that I am skeptical about the advisability of this. Possible--yes. Appropriate and recommended--maybe not. Best wishes!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

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