Doctor Overcorrected a Scleral Show Saying it will Relax into Its Natural Position, is this True?

I have had a lateral tarsal strip procedure done on my right lowr eyelid, afer a lower blepharoplasty left me with a scleral show. I am very bruised and swollen as it is only been three days. My eye looks half the size as the other one and the shape is different to before. My surgeon said he had to overcorrect it as the eye will relax back into it's natural position over the coming weeks. Is this correct or will I end up with this eye a different shape to my other one?

Doctor Answers (3)

Lower scleral show and lateral tarsal strip

+1

Unfortunately, it is too early to tell the results.  I find in patients with significant eyelid laxity that they do get a lot of relaxation of the tissues after surgery, younger patients not as much.  So what your surgeon is telling you is true. You'll have to wait until all the swelling is gone to make a real assessment of symmetry.


Salt Lake City Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Scleral show and canthoplasty

+1

A canthoplasty procedure is performed when there is severe lid laxity and scleral show. At three days, it is way too early to see the final result and certainly the lid will relax a bit.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Three days is much too early to judge the effects of surgery.

+1

Will your surgery ultimately relax and not look so over correct?  It is certainly possible.  Generally I think it is better not to over correct the lateral tarsal strip.  Rather I prefer to use hard palate graft to control the lower eyelid contour and place the canthal angle precisely where it needs to be.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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