Do Scars from Breast Augmentation Ever Fade Completely?

Are there ways to get rid of the appearance of scars? I'm just wondering if this surgery will inevitably leave me with permanent scarring, or if there are ways to prevent this. Thanks in advance for your help!

Doctor Answers (7)

Do scars from breast augmentation ever fade completely?

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Hello! Thank you for the question! It is common for scars to fully mature for up to a year. In the meantime, there are a few things that may help to ameliorate your incision/scar. The most proven (as well as cheapest) modality is simple scar massage. Applying pressure and massaging the well-healed scar has been shown to improve the appearance as it breaks up the scar tissue, hopefully producing the finest scar as possible. Other things that have been shown to add some benefit, albeit controversial, are silicone sheets, hydration, and topical steroids.  These can usually be started at approximately 3-4 weeks postop and when incisions healed.  In addition, avoidance of direct sunlight to the incision will significantly help the appearance as they tend to discolor with UV light during the healing process.  Scars will never disappear, but attempt is made to make the finest scar in a concealed location. 

If unsightly scars are still present after approximately a year's time, other things that your surgeon may consider are intralesional steroid injections, laser, or just surgical revision of the scar itself.

Hope that this helps! Best wishes!


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Fixing breast augmentation and breast implant scars with Melarase AM and Melarase PM

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Breast augmentation scars can be improved with fractional laser and topical application of Melarase AM and Melarase PM creams.  The creams will even out the scar color. 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Scars from Breast Augmentation

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No scar ever completely disappears to the discerning eye, but it is important that incisions are well-placed in an area that they are not noticeable once they fade.  For breast augmentation; under the crease, at the bottom of the nipple, or in the arm pit are popular locations.

It can take about a year for the scars to completely fade, sometimes longer. I hope this helps.

J. Jason Wendel, MD, FACS
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

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Scars after breast augmentation do fade.

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Scars after any surgery do fade with time. I try to put scars in locations that make them more hidden. Also in my practice, patients start a scar control program after all types of surgery. Some patients heal with raised scars or keloid scars, we try to prevent this with the scar control program and see our patient frequently to check the healing.

Sheila Bond, MD
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Scars usually fade over time

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The best scars for augmentation, in my belief are those placed part way around the areola. They fade and disappear the best. The inframammary scars heal well, but not as well as those around the areola.
 

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
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Do inframammary breast scars fade completely?

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Scars, in general, fade with time  but never completely disappear. Location does matter and scars inframammary scars often do well. But at times they result in less than optimal scars and adjunctive treatment may be necessary. You need to discuss this with your plastic surgeon.

George Lefkovits, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
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Scars

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All incisions heal by forming scar, and all scars are permanent.  They will fade over time and can be very inconspicuous, but there will always be a scar.

Donald Griffin, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.