Hard Scar Tissue and Horizontal Bump on Lip After Lip Scar Revision

about 2 years ago i was hit in the mouth playing hockey. My lips were split and immediately stitched up, luckily the cut had not gone above the lip line border onto skin at the top. Anyway, It healed but left a wonky lip line and when i closed my mouth the lining wasn't even. So after about a year i had scar revision the lip lining at the bottom was done well but the surgeon cut through the border of my lip line at the top n the stitching has left a horizontal raised hard bump? Please help?

Doctor Answers (6)

Scar on the upper lip

+2

Scar formation and wound healing can take up to 2 years. There are treatments to reduce scarring like injections, freezing oder laser treatment. Consult with your doctor about the options.


Mainz Dermatologic Surgeon

Lip scar after scar revision procedure

+1
I would recommend consulting with a Board-Certified Dermatologist or Plastic Surgeon regarding options including intralesional kenalog injections and laser therapy, particularly V-beam to repair this scar. Since it has been about a year, the scar is pretty close to being fully mature at this point. 

Jennifer Ahdout, MD, FAAD
Beverly Hills Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Lip scar treatments that can improve lip scar tissue

+1

Lip scars are our specialty and we use a combination surgical and non surgical approach to reduce puffiness, swelling, and visible scars.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

Revision of hypertrophic scarring

+1

Your lip demonstrates a hypertrophic, or exuberant, scar.  It can be treated by steroid injections to attempt to flatten and settle the scar or, if this fails, you could have the area re-excised and closed.  Any re-excision bears the risk of additional scarring.  It can take up to a year after the revision for the scar to settle down.  Steroid injections aren't fun but you should discuss this option with your plastic surgeon.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Scar revision for lip scar

+1

As Dr. Aldea has stated, the scar demonstrates an excessive response to the injury. Use with intralesional steroids could help to soften the scar. Any revision carries the risk of recurrent scarring.  

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Hard Scar Tissue and Horizontal Bump on Lip

+1

Regarding: "Hard Scar Tissue and Horizontal Bump on Lip After Lip Scar Revision
about 2 years ago i was hit in the mouth playing hockey. My lips were split and immediately stitched up, luckily the cut had not gone above the lip line border onto skin at the top. Anyway, It healed but left a wonky lip line and when i closed my mouth the lining wasn't even. So after about a year i had scar revision the lip lining at the bottom was done well but the surgeon cut through the border of my lip line at the top n the stitching has left a horizontal raised hard bump? Please help
"

Few comments - the photo you supplied is fuzzy and makes assessing your lip a bit hard. In the absence of an exam, a sharp photograph is absolutely needed.

As regards "wonky" scars. The medical term is HYPERTROPHIC (large/ raised) scars. Every operation could be complicated by this phenomenon and certain ethnic groups are more prone to it than others.  At 1 year after your revision, what you see is what you get. I FULLY understand your frustration and would not be happy if I was either the patient or the surgeon. Operations around the lips usually heal with much better scars.

Your options are either to: leave it alone and accept the result, to try and flatten the scar with injections of corticosteroids into the scar or to revise it again hoping this does not happen. I would discuss it with your surgeon or get a second opinion.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.