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Scar Tissue Around Silicone Granulomas is Growing, Could This Be Cancer?

I have had silicone granulomas above my right breast since 1984, in the last 6 months they have grown larger. I saw a plastic surgeon in Oct about revision surgery, he felt they are scar tissue, however they have grown larger since I saw him. Could this be cancer? They are very hard.w hat is the best way to determine if this is cancer or just more scar tissue. Should I see the plastic surgeon or a surgeon to do a biopsy. I am very worried. I appreciate any help you may provide. Di in Norman,

Doctor Answers (2)

Growing mass in the breast - always rule out breast cancer first.

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Any woman with a growing mass within the breast should be evaluated by a breast surgeon. This typically involves a mammogram, ultrasound, sometimes an MRI, and often a biopsy. Although silicone granulomas may change over time, it is important for breast cancer to be excluded from the diagnosis early on.

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Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Enlarging Silicone Granulomas

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You didn't mention if you have had the silicone implants removed. If the implants are still present, it is possible that you have extracapsular rupture, which means that silicone from a broken implant can get beyond the scar tissue around the implant, and leak into the breast ducts, causing larger silicone granulomas. If the implants have been removed, this is possible, but less likely.If your surgeon has followed you very closely and you have had routine imaging with mammogram or MRI, he may be comfortable identifying this as scar tissue.

With the enlarging size, I would feel very strongly about obtaining an MRI at minimum, and I would have a very low threshold for referring you to one of our breast surgeons for evaluation and possible biopsy. This is not something that should be ignored.

 

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Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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