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Scarring from Blisters After IPL

I recently had IPL for broken capillaries around my nose. I blistered bad after and now have red scars on each side of my nose. It has been about a month since the treatment. Is there anything that would help or get rid of these scars?

Doctor Answers (1)

Unfortunately there is no perfect treatment, but avoid the sun, and here are some recommendations.

+2

Thanks for your question.

So sorry to hear about your bad experience. Getting blistering for IPL treatment of facial vessels is unusual and unintended, but it does happen. It sounds like the scab has fallen off at this point. The most important thing is to leave the scabs on as long as possible as it will minimize scarring. Now, as the scar has formed and is pink, let's take care of it so it leaves the best mark possible.

I would avoid sun. Sun make the scarring process more noticeable and allows the skin to stay darker longer.

Use an ointment or specialized healing / scarring cream. My recommendation is to try Kelocote twice daily. This silicone formulation is specifically made to reduce the appearance of scarring and make the wound appear as nice as possible.

Do not do any further procedures for the facial vessels or the scarring until you are fully healed. Take your time - the healing process will do best if you avoid doing peels, lasers, microderm, or any other procedures. The only procedure I can think that would / might help would be a resurfacing laser, but that would depend on a very specific independent physician evaluation of your scarring. In general, doing fractional resurfacing for laser burns is not a common practice, but in trying to "think outside the box", this is potentially a viable option for you.

Time will be your best friend while you heal. Try the kelocote, and ask your physician about fractional resurfacing to see if that would apply for you.

Good luck!

Beverly Hills Dermatologist
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