Breast Lift and Implants... One or Two Procedures?

After losing weight and breastfeeding, I have droopy breasts, and would like a good lift with somewhat large implants. However, after seeing several plastic surgeons, whom all have been board certified, some say that the only responsible thing is to do the lift first; then insert implants 6-12 months later. Others claims that two procedures is unfavorable, will cause more trauma to the breasts. Is it so that a BL expert can do BL/BA perfectly in one go, or is it irresponsible to do so?

Doctor Answers (9)

Breast lift with implants

+2

You're asking a intelligent question.  This is a source of significant liability in plastic surgery.  When this operation is performed, you are tightening skin while adding content to the breast.  If this is overdone with either too large an implant or too much skin tightening wound problems occur.  This can result in infection and loss of the implant.  Trying to be perfect is what gets people in trouble. In my practice I do the operation together by adding an implant at the patient's desired size and reducing the skin volume.  Although I set the nipple areola height for where I want the final, I always under resect the lower skin so that it does not breakdown.  At 4-6 months later I do a minor office revision for 400.00 to tighten the skin that is between the areola and the lower breast fold. I have had no complications with doing this operative procedure as a major and minor revision procedure staged.


Oshkosh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

There is not one right answer to your question

+2

This is a topic of debate among plastic surgeons and there is no right answer. Some surgeons feel that it is fine to do this at one sitting, while others are equally sure that the two procedures should always be done separately. I have done both and obtained good results. 

This is something that should be individualized after consultation between the patient and surgeon. Find a surgeon with whom you feel comfortable and follow his/her recommendations. It is definitely possible to get an excellent result with either technique.

 

Good luck!

Barry Press, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon

I usually do them at the same time

+2

In patients who need lift and implant, which is most people I do them at the same time and get very good results.  Be prepared however, that your lift will come down some with time.  This will happen less if you use smaller implants that won't stress the lift as much.

Scott Tucker, MD
Winston Salem Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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LIft and breast augmentation together or not

+1

This is a common question and every surgeon will have a different answer.  Some surgeons believe it's best to stage the procedure and others believe it should be performed at the same time saving in cost and recovery.  There are a few instances where I would recommend staging the procedure, but I typically perform it at the same time with successful results.  Keep in mind that either way, you may need a small touch up in the office to revise a part of the scar for example.  Whichever method you decide upon, make sure your surgeon does many breast lifts with augmentations and that you feel comfortable with your surgeon.  ac

Angela Champion, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
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Augmentation and breast lift at same time

+1

In a perfect world the procedures should be staged.  This adds to cost and requires two anesthetics.  Most patients want to do augmentation and lift in same setting.  There are more variables when done together and a higher revision and complication rate than if staged.  That said, many combined surgery cases have had good outcomes.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Simultaneous breast augmentation and lift

+1

There is not a single correct answer to your question. What really matters is the opinion and comfort level of your surgeon with these procedures. Simultaneous breast augmentation and lift can be challenging, but I and most of the plastic surgeons I know peform both procedures at one session. If you and your surgeon feel comfortable with this, combining the procedures is a very reasonable option. 

Andres Taleisnik, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Breast lift and augmentation is technically more demanding

+1

Women who desire to improve their breast aesthetics after childbearing or weight loss may often need a combination of a breast lift (to reposition the nipple on the breast mound) and and a breast augmentation (to restore breast volume). The volume of the breast affects the nipple position, and the position of the implant on the chest wall may also visually raise or lower the position of the nipple. The appearance of the breast also changes over time as the breast tissue and skin grow or stretch. When a surgeon places an implant and performs a lift, he or she is juggling all these variables. This makes a combination breast augment/mastopexy a technically more demanding operation than either an augment or mastopexy alone. Some surgeons may prefer to stage the procedure as two operations, some feel comfortable doing a single procedure, perhaps with a minor revision if things don't work out perfectly the first time. Either way is appropriate and responsible. 

Robert J. Carpenter, MD
Cumberland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Breast Lift and Implants

+1

Breast lifts and implants are done frequently if not all of the time together.  There are some exceptions but in the majority of cases they can and should be done at the same time. 

 

 

Robert Kearney, MD, FACS
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast lift with augmentation is commonly done concurrently.

+1

If everyone is convinced that a breast augmentation combined with a breast lift will yield the best final result there is no reason to stagger them.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.