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How Safe is Sclerotherapy on the Chest?

I've had laser treat some spider veins on my legs and was happy with the results. It got me thinking that I should go ahead and get rid of the green veins I have running across my chest. They are not protruding or anything. These are completely healthy veins, but it's just that they are pretty obvious when I'm out in daylight so no bikini tops for me. Are there any risks to destroying these healthy veins across the chest?

Doctor Answers (7)

Sclerotherapy for Chest Veins

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Sclerotherapy is a very safe treatment for chest veins. I frequently treat chest veins in a safe and effective way using foam sclerotherapy.

Web reference: http://www.gbkderm.com/varicose-veins-sclerotherapy-san-diego

San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Sclerotherapy on the Chest?

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Thank you for your question. The chest is a very high risk area, and the scar risk is very high. You have to dislike the veins very much to take this kind of risk. A scar on the chest is never a good one, and is usually very ugly. I hope this helps.

Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Unsightly veins on the chest

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Small, unsightly veins on the chest, or even the back can be easily and effectively treated with a series of sclerotherapy sessions performed by an experienced physician.

Toronto Dermatologist

Sclerotherapy on the Chest

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Visible veins on the chest can be very safely and effectively treated with sclerotherapy, it may require more than one treatment.  The sclerosant used depends on the skin color.  It is not painful, and can be done in the office.

Alabama Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Sclerotherapy Works Well For Broken Blood Vessels On The Chest & Spider Leg Veins

+1

Despite the advent of lasers, sclerotherapy, or the injection of a sclerosing solution to close off unwanted and superfluous spider veins on both the chest and the legs, is still considered the method of choice. The appearance of one new laser after another (the so-called "Next Big Thing"), each one supposedly superceding the previous type, is implicit testimony to the fact that laser technology in this (as in many other skin treatment) has hardly been perfected yet

On the other hand, sclerotherapy has stood the test of time, with decades of proven efficacy and safety, and yields fairly consisent and gratifying cosmetic results. Various sclerosing materials are currently available, and the particular one chosen will depend upon the specific areas needing treatment and the experience of the injector. Typically, for best results, two to four treatment sessions are needed per treatment site spaced at monthly intervals. Fees for each treatment may vary from $350-$750/session, depending upon the material used and the size of the area treated.

 

Web reference: http://YoungerLookingWithoutSurgery.com

New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Sclerotherapy to veins on chest

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I often perform sclerotherapy to veins on the chest. Sometimes these types of veins can occur more there because of breast enhancement surgery too. Either way, they can be treated effectively and it poses no risk. Surface veins like this are not needed for proper blood flow so there is no reason they cannot be treated with injections.

Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

No risk.

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Sclerotherapy works very well of chest veins. I have often injected veins on the breasts and decollete with very excellent results.  This is strictly considered cosmetic sclerotherapy.  Over 15 years I have not seen a single complication or untoward result from this.  Just as leg sclerotherapy, 2 to 3 treatments may be necessary to reach the end result.

Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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