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I Am Scheduled for Breast Lift (Left Side Only) & Implant Replacement. How Does the Pain Compare to Original Augmentation?

Also, wondering if by going bigger will cause additional risks. I am 5'6 115. I currently have 390cc(L) 430(r) Saline Mods, 34D bra. The lift will hopefully create more symmetry with the shape of my Breasts. I would like a slight increase in size and better projection as well. What amount of cc's allows for a noticeable difference without compromising pockets & tissue?

Doctor Answers (7)

Lift

+1

I do not typically advise patients to use different size implants on the opposite sides. The quest for perfect symmetry is often not possible


New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Implant Upsizing and Unilateral Lift

+1

   In general, the replacement of implants without any substantial pocket manipulation is not very painful.  For that matter, the lift should not be very painful either.   If the implants were placed under the muscle originally, the muscle spasm and discomfort initially is much worse.  As far as size to increase, you have to consider how much more you want.  The pockets generally do not have to be adjusted for 100 cc or 150 cc increase.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 240 reviews

Increasing size

+1

Very good questions.  It is always nice when a patient undertands that there are consequences to heavier and wider implants.  Whereas bottoming out can be corrected, breast atrophy cannot.  It is permanent and has breast feeding consequences as well as tissue integrity and support consequences.   Unfortunately there is no formula that allows us to predict these things.  Board Certified Plastic Surgeons are all experts on this subject and your doctor will help you naviagate through these questions.  Good luck. 

David Marcus, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Secondary breast surgery

+1

The secondary surgeries usually cause less pain unless it involves changing the implant pocket from subglandular to subpectoral. Expect to be sore and swollen but not as bad.

Jacob Freiman, MD, FACS
Miami Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 121 reviews

Breast implant replacement and lift

+1

Usually the secondary surgery of an implant replacement and lift is not as uncomfortable as the primary surgery.  It really depends upon what was done.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Usually quick recovery with breast implant replacement

+1

Replacing implants does not require the amount of surgery that creating the space for implants the first time does, so recovery is typically much faster. Going a little bit bigger does not change that much, but the general rule is that the bigger the implants, the more likelihood of long-term problems such as rippling and bottoming out.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Concerns about Revisionary Breast Augmentation Surgery?

+1

Thank you for the question, but as you can imagine, it is difficult to give you precise advice despite your good description of your goals. Generally speaking, it is possible to go moderately larger with breast implants without significantly increasing risk. Also, most patients who undergo breast implant exchange operations report much less discomfort, less pain medication requirement, and a faster recovery overall.

 Unfortunately, online consultants will not be able to provide you with more precise advice regarding implant size that will best meet your goals; I would suggest that you communicate these goals very carefully with your plastic surgeon. In my practice, I prefer the use of goal pictures to help with this communication process.

 Best wishes with your upcoming procedure.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 794 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.