What Are the Possible Risks in Shaving Down Nose Hump?

I have small hump on my nose (dorsal) part of the prominence resulted from and injury and part I feel was inherited? I never really noticed before I broke my nose. Anyway, I was wondering what the risks were to shave it down?

Are there any risks later on down the road as I get older; changes in appearance from the front, nose drooping, or having extra skin? I found a pic online of what mine looks similar to. My "hump" is a little higher (further from the tip, closer in relevance to my eyes) but its about the same size. Thanks.

Doctor Answers (16)

Nasal Dorsal Humps

+1

Complications are uncommon following rhinoplasty, but in rare cases they may occur for a variety of reasons. In the post-operative period, patients undergoing rhinoplasty may experience bleeding, infection, asymmetry, chronic swelling, numbness and prolonged tenderness.

                  Removal of nasal dorsal humps may be associated with unique complications following rhinoplasty. These include boney irregularities of the nasal dorsum, and rarely a complication known as an open roof deformity. This occurs when the paired nasal bones stay separated following take down of the dorsal hump because of inadequate infracture.

                  Late complications can also occur following rhinoplasty and removal of nasal humps. Once swelling has resolved patients may not be happy with their aesthetic result. In other cases, over resection of bone and cartilage can result in a condition known as an internal valve collapse which can result in nasal airway obstruction. In a small number of cases the hump can return due to calcium deposits and scar tissue. Rarely excess nasal skin generated by removal of dorsal humps can sag resulting in nasal deformities.

                  Although complications can occur following this type of procedure they can usually be minimized with appropriate surgical care and good communication between surgeon and patient. 


Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

1 risk of shaving a nose comment is open roof deformity

+1

Thank you for your question.  Be sure to consult a plastic surgeon who is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, experienced in rhinoplasty surgery and who has an excellent reputation in your community.

Generally speaking my biggest concern about rasping or shaving a dorsal pump of the nose is that if too much is removed the 2 nasal bones can  be visualized through the skin a condition called open roof deformity.  Be sure to discuss these concerns with a plastic surgeon you consult.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Risks associated with shaving down dorsal hump

+1
The largest complication that can occur from shaving down of the dorsal hump is if the hump wants to re-grow. There is a 10% chance of having to perform a minor revision procedure on the bridge to file down a regrowth of calcium deposit after the rhinoplasty.
Once the bump is shaved down, osteotomies will have to be performed to narrow the sidewalls. There are no other risks later down the road from the front, side, or tip views as long as the nose is not broken. There are no issues with extra skin because it re-drapes over the nose after rhinoplasty.For many examples, please see the link below to our rhinoplasty photo gallery

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

You might also like...

Removal of Nasal Bump

+1

Depending on size, the bump may be shaved or actually removed. Most times the nasal bones must be mobilized to achieve or maintain normal contour. In 35 years of this work, this is probably the most common request in primary cosmetic rhinoplasty.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Fixing a nasal hump

+1

This is a seeming simple operation that in many cases is much more complex that meets the eye. The composition of the dorsal hump will vary from patient to patient--part of it is cartilage and part of it is bone. Furthermore, the length of your nasal bones will affect how much can be safely removed. Sometimes, a hump is not really due to excess of the dorsum but recession of the 'radix' area above it. Personal examination by an experiences rhinoplasty surgeon can help you determine what is best for you. Each of these situations engenders different technical considerations, which in turn will vary the risk profile for you.

Best of luck to you.

Sam Most, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Dorsal nasal hump

+1

Shaving down the bump on the dorsum of the nose is done all the time in rhinoplasty surgery. One risk, is that it may expose an underlying curvature but this can be corrected at the time of surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Removing a nasal hump

+1

Hello,

There are risks involved with any surgery. With rhinoplasty, a few associated risks may be asymmetry, irregularities, chronic swelling, infection, and bleeding. For a full explanation of risks to be aware of with rhinoplasty please see my youtube page and website. When performed properly by a highly skilled surgeon, a rhinoplasty should look great years down the road, and risks will be minimized.

A columellar strut can prevent the nose from drooping in the future. Extra skin is usually not an issue. It is difficult to determine exactly what your needs are without seeing your photos and/or performing an examination. If you wish, you may send any photos to my office and I would be happy to evaluate them for you. Thank you and best of luck.

Dr. Nassif

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Risks of nasal hump removal with nose job (rhinoplasty)

+1

Drooping of the nose is a natural consequence of aging and happens irregardless of surgery. Although I am not aware of any study that has followed this process longterm, my experience would tell me that noses that are operated upon tend to sag LESS than natural noses (my opinion) over time.

Risks include but are not limited to infection, bleeding, hematoma, visibile or palpable irregularities, pain, tenderness, numbness, septal hematoma or fistula, epistaxis, synechia, vestibular stenosis, audible or restricted nasal obstruction, need for subsequent revisionary procedures, non-union, malunion, and inability to guarantee any specific cosmetic result.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Risks and Additional Surgery associated with Shaving a Nasal Hump Down

+1

The back of the nose (hump) is made of a variable combination of the 2 upper lateral cartilages and 2 nasal bones with variable contribution from the perpendicular septum. When shaving the hump down variable elements of these components are affected. If a small shave is involved and the side walls are still together / not separated, then in-fracturing of the side walls may not be needed. If the shaving down / rasping takes a segment of the roof off and the walls are separated, they need to be moved together by breaking the side walls and pushing the tops together. Failing to do so would leave you with a flat, wide nose - called an "Open Roof Deformity".

In the process of shaving the hump, the septum which appeared to be straight may have a deviation in it deeper and require straightening. This may require one of several technique, most likely placement of Spreader Grafts.

ALL operations have unavoidable complications despite everything we do. If you are not willing to accept the complications despite how rare they may be - do not have the surgery.

Good Luck.

Dr. P. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Risks of Rhinoplasty Hump Removal

+1

There are risks associated with any surgery. In some patients, actually building up the nose instead of taking down the hump is more appropriate.

For a straight forward hump removal, an 'inverted-v' deformity of the nasal bones and collapse of the midvault are possible if the procedure is not done correctly. 'Inverted-V' is where the bone is shaved off and created a hollow over the bones on the top portion of the nose. Over time, the overlying skin sinks in. To correct this, at the time of surgery, the bones are broken and allowed to fall in so that the gap does not form. The midvault collapse is easily corrected at the time of surgery as well.

I would suggest visiting a surgeon who specializes in rhinoplasty or at least facial surgery to ensure your best possible results.

D.J. Verret, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.