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How Much of a Risk is Latisse to my Vision?

I've read that Latisse users are at risk of developing keratitis, which can ultimately lead to blindness. I'm a contact wearer (and a not so sanitary one at that) so I guess I've been at risk of developing the infection for a while anyways, but as long as I use the sterile applicators that come with Latisse and follow the manufacturer's instructions, will I remain infection-free? I don't want to have beautiful, long eyelashes if I won't be able to see them! My vision is my utmost priority!

Doctor Answers (7)

risk of blindness or vision loss with Latisse

+1

Latisse is very safe, and effective for eyelash growth. Since it is not applied to the cornea, but to the eyelid skin margin, there should be no risk of vision loss. If redness, irritation, or dryness occur simply stop the Latisse and consult your doctor before resuming the product.


Peoria Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Latisse and risk

+1

    Since Latisse is technically a drug (CHEMICAL) application......Risks versus rewards versus necessity must be taken into account. Latisse is used  as a cosmetic enhancement which is of no medical importance. So if there are any risks possible an individual needs to weigh them against the real need to use Latisse. However, if you use the individual applicators and stick to proper application technique both the likelihood and reported incidence of infections is very low.

Richard Galitz, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Latisse was developed from medicine used as eyedrops

+1

Latisse was developed from a drug that was used to treat glaucoma, an eye disease, and was applied as eye drops.  It was discovered that this also made the lashes longer and darker.  IIt is safe to use around the eyes.  The single use sterile applicators reduce the chance of contamination.  Follow the instructions and you are very safe.

Daryl K. Hoffman, MD
Los Gatos Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Latisse and Vision Loss

+1

The chances of you having issues from Latisse are very low. Allergan provides a significant amount of brushes to help reduce the spread of any bacterias. Speak with your provider about your concerns and they will explain the risks more thoroughly and be a good resource for you.

Jeffrey Hartog, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Can Latisse Harm The Eye?

+1

Latisse is used to grow fuller, longer and darker lashes.  It is important to have a complete eye exam prior to its use, including a eye pressure check. Latisse comes with applicators that are to be used one for each eye.  The goal being to reduce the chance of developing an ocular infection.   It is to be applied at night and I trust you don't sleep in your contact lenses, if you do, it is best to remove them for a brief period of time as you apply the Latisse.  Latisse is very well tolerated, however, some people may develop a slight sensitivity. There are some products that do not contain Bimatoprost.  Hope this helps.

Leslie M. Sims, MD
Las Vegas Ophthalmologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

How Much of a Risk is Latisse to my Vision

+1

You can get keratitis from anything, really, including mascara and contacts, and just touching your eyes. It's a bacteria. So, that's why Allergan wants you to use one brush, per eye, single use. It's a way of preventing bacteria from transferring or spreading. But are you only using mascara once and then tossing it? I think not. So, really, you're already at the same level of risk by using mascara as you would be with using Latisse.

F. Victor Rueckl, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Risk of Vision Impairment with Latisse

+1

Anything can happen with any procedures or treatments performed in medicine. That being said, I am not aware of any reports of vision impairment if Latisse is used properly. In fact, the most common worry patients have is color change of the eyes. This certainly can occur, but only if placed in the eye itself (as directed for glaucoma) and not on the eyelid.

Gus Galante, MD
Schererville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.