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Ripples at the End of a Tummy Tuck Incision? (photo)

im 6 weeks po today and would like to know if these ripples/dents that i have above the end of my incision is normal? and when does this usually go away? i had a full tt and flank lipo.. my flanks still seem quite large and feels soft now so does that mean the area is no longer swollen?

Doctor Answers (3)

Early result after an abdominoplasty

+1

If you were made of cloth those lateral ripples would never go away.  But your skin has an elastic quality to it and over time these generally smooth out.  From your photos it appears that you will get a nice result.  If you continue with the lateral fullness then some degree of touch up liposuction may be needed.  

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Ripples at end of tummy tuck incision

+1

Your end result will be quite good when all is said and done. The pleating of the skin that you see will resolve in the next 6 weeks or so. The flanks are still a bit full in my opinion and would be my only criticism of this result. I routinely treat the flanks with conservative liposuction for all of my abdominoplasty patients to avoid this. I do not think that all of the fullness in the flank will resolve with time, unfortunately. 

Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

"Ripples" Along Tummy Tuck Incision?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

“Rippling” and a pleated  appearance along tummy tuck incisions may persist for several months after surgery. Your incision will likely improve in appearance during the first year after surgery.  You may also find that the flank area will improve in appearance as further swelling resolves and the skin redrapes.

I would suggest continued patience and follow up with your plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_tummyTuck.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 626 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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