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I Have Right Orbital Floor Blowout Fracture with Minimal Displacement Identified, Can I Do Anything?

Doctors decided not to do any surgeon treatment. Just asked me to make exercises to use eye's muscles. I have a small diplopia. I wonder if it is possible that event if there is displacement there is no operation necessary. Will these bones knit together? Moreover my right eye is a little bit lower. I cannot see it, but doctors sayit is. Can I wear contact lenses?

Doctor Answers (3)

Right Orbital Blowout Fracture Treatment?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Based on your description of  the fracture, I think you're physicians have made the right call and I would suggest continued follow-up with them for evaluation of  the diplopia and the position of the globes.

Best wishes.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 626 reviews

Blowout fracture of the orbit and what is the best treatment

+1

Blowout fracture of the orbit   with minimal displacement is a clinical call by the surgeon and patient.  If the X-rays show almost no displacement then the physical signs of diplopia (double vision) and unequal eye placement comes becomes a  judgement call.  You have not told us how long ago you had your injury or  how it happened.  If you are further out than two weeks and there  is resistance on  pulling on the conjuctiva in an upward movement,  I would explore the orbital floor and see if there is a trapped muscle.  It is an easy, simple procedure and recovery is quick.   You should be advised to have yearly ocular pressure measurments.  It has been observed that there is a high incidence of late on set of glaucoma following a blowout fracture.

 

 

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Minimally Displaced Orbital Floor Fracture

+1

With minimal downward displacement of an orbital floor fracture, no surgical treatment would be beneficial. Early on you will have some swelling and diplopia, but that will resolve within a month after the injury. The orbital floor bones will heal, whether it by direct bony healing or just fibrous union. Either way, the orbital floor will be stable and provide adequate vertical support to the intraorbital contents.

Web reference: http://www.eppleyplasticsurgery.com/eyelid.html

Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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