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White Bump Along Rhinoplasty Incision

I had a nose job (Rhinoplasty) 2 years ago. After a year, I noticed a small bump inside my nose where the incision was made to insert the silicone (I'm not really sure if it's called silicone or something else). All throughout that years, the small bump either bleeds or is always wet and I had to carry a tissue with me to wipe it everywhere I go.

Now, the bump started to disappear. But I noticed a white thing stuck on that same place where I had the bump. I tried to peek inside my nose and I really saw a white hard thing coming out from where I had the incision. My guess is, it is the silicon itself that is starting to come out. Can anybody tell me what it is? Would it damage my nose? Is it really possible that the silicone itself would come out of the skin? It also bleeds sometimes. It doesn't hurt, but I'm really worried. How does a surgical clinic charge for a check-up? And how much does it usually cost?

Doctor Answers (2)

Silicone Nasal Implant

+1

Silicone graft extrusion is a possible complication with the use of this material. Once the graft is exposed it will continue to work it's way to the surface, causing more damage to the skin or nasal lining. This is why I prefer to use the patient's own tissue as grafts.

It's not an emergency, but schedule a consultation with a rhinoplasty surgeon in the near future. It may be necessary to remove the silicone. Inquire about the fee when making the appointment.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Likely to be exposed silicone implant

+1

It sounds as if the implant has becomes exposed and should be removed. Typically, the operating surgeon should not charge you to be re-evaluated but you may be responsible for additional fees if and when you go back to the operating room. Every surgeon has his or her own policy regarding revisional surgery so alot depends on your particular surgeon.

Good Luck!

Bel Air Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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