Too Soon to Have Rhinoplasty After Non-surgical Nose Job?

I had Radiesse injected into the bridge of my nose 4 months ago it appears to have dissolved but I'm not completely sure. I want to have surgery to rebuild the bridge with ear cartilage. Is it too soon to have Rhinoplasty surgery? If there is any Radiesse left in the nose, will my doctor be able to find it and remove it during surgery?

Doctor Answers (20)

Rhinoplasty after Radiesse Injections

+3

If Radiesse is used to augment or shape the nose it will take about a year for all the material to dissolve and your nose to resume its previous shape. If you perform surgery on the nose prior to all the synthetic material dissolving the surgeon will not be able to judge the thickness of your tissues well enough to predict the final shape. It is best to wait, and then get it done correctly.


Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Radiesse lasts a year or so, but it might be okay

+2

If the augmentation is lost, I think it would be okay to consider rhinoplasty. Radiesse is made up of 30% hydroxyapatite and 70% of the carrier. Much of the carrier dissipates over the course of the year. It might be prudent to wait. But if you think the results are essentially back to normal you could consider rhinoplasty and an implant to raise your nasal bridge. What is left in your nose is likely the hydroxyapatite and this could stay in your nose for years. Biopsies of the bladder have shown it to be there for 5 years. Hence if most of the augmentation is gone you could do the rhinoplasty earlier than the full year that it is expected to give you results. If you really wanted to be safe you could wait for the full year to pass.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Rhinoplasty After Non-Surgical Nose Job

+1

Depending on the type of filler that was used I would usually have the patient wait at least 6-9 months after hyaluronic acid fillers were used such as Juvederm or Restylane. If Radiesse was used, you may need to wait longer as this is not a good filler for the dorsum of the nose as there is only little subcutaneous tissue. This may be problematic in a secondary rhinoplasty.

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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Rhinoplasty After Non-surgical Nose Job

+1

Typically, you will need a year after a radiesse treament prior to rhinoplasty. During consultation, ensure that the surgeons know that you have had radiesse so the surgeons have a full understanding of your situation so they can advise you appropriately.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Nose Surgery after Injectable

+1

Difficult obviously to give a definitive answer not knowing exactly how much filler was injected; my thoughts though are that the carrier used in the fomulation of Radiesse has dissolved and you are currently left with the Calcium Hydroxyappetite filler component of the filler which gives the volume enhancement and longevity of the product. But again, not knowing the specifics is a sizeable handicap. As such, I would wait as long as you can before embarking on corrective nasal surgery as the goal is a more permanent construct based on baseline anatomy. If the filler is providing volume and contour changes, albeit even on a small scale, it may adversely impact your final result. I recommend waiting until about 10-12 months before surgery.

See your board certified plastic surgeon for specific answer to your individual case and anatomy.

Good luck!

Dr. C

John Philip Connors III, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Wait 1 year before embarking on rhinoplasty

+1

It is probably important to wait at least a year from the injection of Radiesse into the bridge before proceeding with any reconstructive nasal surgery. Radiesse can last upwards of a couple of years in the nose before it finally dissolves away.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Rhinoplasty options

+1

The Radiesse may have dissolved, but if not your surgeon may see it during your rhinoplasty.  It would probably be okay to go ahead with the procedure, just make sure the Radiesse is replaced with cartilage or bone during the rhinoplasty.  Good luck!

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Patience is best to insure best result

+1

Rhinoplasty requires accurate evaluation of nasal contours at the time of surgery to obtain the desired result and the difference of a millimeter or two is noticable. Radiesse usually lasts about a year in relatively immobile locations such as the nose and I would advise waiting the full year to avoid any unexpected contour changes later.

Mark Beaty, MD
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Radiesse in the Nose

+1

It is very unlikely the radiesse has disolved after four months. If you have surgery now, it will be impossible to effectively remove residual radiesse. Take pictures to document your present profile. Compare them to the photographs taken before radiesse injections. This will help determine when the material has absorbed. It usually takes about one year. Then have your rhinoplasty. Be patient.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Compare photos to determine if any Radiesse is left in radix

+1

You will need to wait 2 - 6 more months for all of the Radiesse to be dissolved. This being said it would be very beneficial to review any pre-injection photos to determine the degree of your original contour deformity and then any post injection photos to determine the degree of correction. This compared to your current photo will be useful.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.