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Can Rhinoplasty Give Me a Bigger Nose and More Room in Nasal Passages for Breathing?

I have a smallish nose. I would like to have a bigger nose and more room to breathe. What are the chances that a rhinoplasty would help me breathe better?

Doctor Answers (16)

Many changes can be done with rhinoplasty

+2

Many changes can be done with rhinoplasty- small noses can be made larger, and large noses can be made smaller.  Addressing your breathing and improving the ease with which air travels through your nose should be addressed in any type of rhinoplasty- remember that your nose is not only meant to be attractive, but breathing is a key nasal function that should be maximized!


Santa Barbara Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Improving breathing with rhinoplasty

+2

Yes, there are procedures and techniques that can be used during rhinoplasty that can help with your breathing.  Depending on your anatomy, cartilage from within your nose can be used to open of the breathing passages to allow more airflow.  Good luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Augmentation Rhinoplasty Can Also Help Improve Functional Breathing

+2

Hi,

Great question.  Yes, in aumentation rhinoplasty, the nose may be made larger with the use of cartilaginous nasal septal grafts.  Spreader grafts, columellar structs, tip grafts, and lateral alar batten grafts may be used to help improve functional breathing as well.

Choose your rhinoplasty surgeon most carefully.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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Rhinoplasty can improve nasal breathing

+2

Though it is true that rhinoplasty can adversely affect the nasal air passage, rhinoplasty can also be designed to address airway issues as well and improve breathing. The air passing through the nose is affected by the turbinates which warm and moisten the air, the septum which divides one nasal passage from the other, and the internal valve which is formed by the cartilage in the bridge of the nose just above the tip. A  problem with the airflow can be affected by one or all of these areas. The structure of each area can be addressed during nasal shaping to improve breathing. Rhinoplasty cannot improve breathing due to other causes such as allergic rhinitis, or nasal polyps. Your surgeon should do a careful exam and history to determine the cause of breathing difficulty before rhinoplasty, and include a fix where appropriate at the time of surgery.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Rhinoplasty can build up noses and improve breathing as well

+2

Rhinoplasty has the traditional image of only making noses smaller. Frequently we also make noses bigger when indicated and improve or restore better breathing. As a matter of fact, I add to a number of areas in most rhinoplasties for aesthetic and functional reasons. You should be evaluated by a rhinoplasty expert who has experience in functional as well as aesthetic nasal surgery.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Surgery for bigger nose & better breathing

+1

Making the nose bigger is a cosmetic procedure and not a breathing procedure. If there is a breathing issue regarding the nose, this is done out of medical necessity. The two procedures that are performed on the inside of the nose to improve airflow dynamics are a septoplasty and turbinate reduction procedure. The combination of these two will improve airflow through the nose if needed. Making the nose bigger is a cosmetic procedure and is paid for by the patient. There are multiple different cartilage grafts that can be placed to make the nose taller, wider, and to fit and balance with the facial features.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Rhinoplasty and breathing

+1

Breathing issues are multifactorial.  Sometimes, it is as easy as putting in spreader grafts which open up the internal valve a bit.  Difficult to tell without examining you.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Rhinoplasty for Bigger Nose

+1

You can increase the size of your airway to improve breathing without making the nose bigger. Certainly, both can be accomplished. Clarify your goals with an experienced surgeon.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Rhinoplasty to increase size of nose

+1

It is possible to increase the size of your nose and improve your breathing while doing so. Rhinoplasty alone may help you breathe better, depending on the nature of your situation. If you have a deviated septum as well, a functional septorhinoplasty may be performed where your deviated septum is fixed and your nose may be cosmetically altered and made more aesthetically pleasing while increasing functionality.

I would really need to see photos and/or perform an examination in order to give you the best advice. Please feel free to send me photos, you may find my contact information in my profile. Thank you and best of luck.

Dr. Nassif

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

More Complicated Rhinoplasty

+1

Making a nose bigger in Rhinoplasty is possible, but much more complex than reductive Rhinoplasty.  Improving nasal function (breathing) is also possible depending on the nature of the problem which is impairing nasal air flow. If the problem is structural (deviated septum, nasal valve collapse, post-surgical), it can usually be addressed with surgery. If nasal breathing is impaired by environmental factors (allergy), other treatments should be explored first.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.