Does the Hump Significantly Affect the Dorsum's Profile Shape?

I had a Rhinoplasty about two months ago and am generally satisfied with the results. I had my tip narrowed and slightly elevated, nose bones straightened (broke my nose years ago), and the hump reduced. The swelling has decreased very quickly and most of the narrowing has already taken place.

I went in to the surgery not bothered with my hump and only agreed to get it reduced when my doctor advised that the profile would look unattractive, and that the hump would be more visible with a narrowed nose. I understand from the answers I received to my previous question that it is rare for patients to request to keep a little bit of the hump.

I had not researched hump rhinoplasty before my surgery, as I was not really concerned with it. I couldn't even recognize where the hump exactly was, because the other irregularities in my nose were more visible. My doctor said that my hump was at the top of my nose and not at the lower half of the bridge. So now I wonder, does the little hump that I still have, located at the top of my nose, affect the lower part of the dorsum? I am slightly bothered with my profile, as it curves a bit. Does this relate to the hump, or tip projection? I appreciate any help.

Doctor Answers (7)

Everything is related to everything else on your face

+3

Each part of your face is part of a jigsaw puzzle. Each piece fits with the others and plays off other pieces. For instance, a large dorsal hump makes the chin look smaller. Also, a small bump on the top of the nose will make the bottom look smaller or curved a little. However, removal of bony humps can remain swollen for up to a year, thus I would suggest that you enjoy your nose and reserve the use of metal energy for when the results are final.


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Nasal Hump is an Important Part of Nasal Profile

+2

Removing the Nasal Hump will change your Nasal Profile. If you had your rhinoplasty two months ago and you are concerned about too much "curve" in your profile, I doubt that this will improve over time. You should wait at least 6 months before you consider making any changes. I would recommend considering a "non-surgical" correction if you have too much hump removed. I charge only $1000 to make this correction, and it can usually be done 6 months after the primary rhinoplasty. Larger "Saddle-Nose" type defects will require a secondary rhinoplasty to correct. I also recommend selecting a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon for these types of secondary rhinoplasty procedures.

Daniel Reichner, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Does the Nasal Hump Affect the Rest of the Nose?

+2

Hi Jay,

Your rhinoplasty surgeon is the best source to answer your questions and concerns.

Your nasal dorsum profile is made up of the underlying nasal bones, cartilage, and skin. The hump is a result of the cartilage and bone in the area where they meet in the upper 1/3 of nose.

The hump does not affect the structures below and above it. Should you still be dissatisfied at 6 to 12 months after your original surgery, then at the revision surgery more hump may be removed, or your own nasal cartilage may be used to augment the "curve". Stay in touch with your surgeon.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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Remaining small Nose Hump after Nose Surgery (Rhinoplasty)

+1

Regarding:  "I had a Rhinoplasty about two months ago and am generally satisfied with the results. I had my tip narrowed and slightly elevated, nose bones straightened (broke my nose years ago), and the hump reduced. The swelling has decreased very quickly and most of the narrowing has already taken place.

I went in to the surgery not bothered with my hump and only agreed to get it reduced when my doctor advised that the profile would look unattractive, and that the hump would be more visible with a narrowed nose. I understand from the answers I received to my previous question that it is rare for patients to request to keep a little bit of the hump.

I had not researched hump rhinoplasty before my surgery, as I was not really concerned with it. I couldn't even recognize where the hump exactly was, because the other irregularities in my nose were more visible. My doctor said that my hump was at the top of my nose and not at the lower half of the bridge. So now I wonder, does the little hump that I still have, located at the top of my nose, affect the lower part of the dorsum? I am slightly bothered with my profile, as it curves a bit. Does this relate to the hump, or tip projection? I appreciate any help.'

As I understand your question now - you went from "couldn't even recognize where the hump exactly was, because the other irregularities in my nose were more visible" to having a nice rhinoplasty with which you ARE happy but still having a small, residual upper hump which "slightly bothers" you.

I would discuss this with your surgeon. Depending on the nature of the hump it may be masked with fillers (Non-surgical Rhinoplasty) temporarily or permanently or shaved / rasped down as a revision procedure. I would advise you wait 10-12 months until all swelling goes away.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Dorsal Hump And Profile

+1

Every part of the nose is related to other parts.  The tip, tip projection, dorsal profile, radix, supratip, etc.  When there is concern about a part of the nose, it is important to not only assess that part, but how it relates to the other parts.

Anil R. Shah, MD
Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Yes, even a small hump can affect the dorsal line

+1

A small hump even at the top of the nose can affect the overall dorsal aesthetic line of the nose. It tends to create the appearance of having a broken nose. A hump on the nose is usually not considered feminine.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Nasal hump defines the dorsal profile

+1

I think I recall your past question concerning what others expect with the nasal hump in rhinoplasty. The shape of the dorsum whether convex (hump), neutral or straight, or concave will establish or define the dorsal profile. The nasal hump that patients refer to is in the mid section of the dorsum though the shape can vary.

As a surgeon, once we have established the best plan for a particular patient concerning the shape of the dorsum, we also have to decide on the height of the dorsum and consider what these changes will have on the shape and projection of the tip of the nose, and how the dorsal height will affect nasal width.

I don't mean to confuse you however any small change in one part of the nose can impact another. As I commented before, computer imaging will help you best appreciate what your present result looks like and how furture changes can positively, or negatively impact your result. It's not what we call the hump, it is what your present nose looks like and what displeases you about it, and lastly what can or should be done to set things straight.

If it bothers you, pursue another consultation.

Best of luck.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.