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How Many Rhinoplasties Can One Patient Undergo?

Doctor Answers (13)

Rhinoplasty Limits

+2

That's tough to answer I've made revisions to other surgeons' rhinoplasty work when it was the third or fourth surgery.  However, these were somewhat limited or small changes and you have to understand that with each rhinoplasty procedure there is more scar tissue and things become a little less predictable as far as outcome is concerned. 

Two is fine.  A third procedure can be done but you want to be focused on your goal and have reasonable expectations.  Gerenally speeking it is medically safe if that is your concern.

Hope that helps.

Dr. Lay


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Number of Rhinoplasties in a Lifetime

+1

The question should be, why is there a need to have so many rhinoplasties in the first place? Rhinoplasty is the most difficult surgery to perform in plastic surgery. It is prudent to get it right the first time. Every time a rhinoplasty is performed you are limited in not only what you can do, but also the results that can be obtained. The prudent course is to make sure when you have a rhinoplasty that you have it done by someone who is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist or in Plastic Surgery has experience and expertise in rhinoplasty.

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Multiple Rhinoplasty Surgeries

+1

Hello,

There is no predetermined amount of surgeries that an individual can have performed. It is best to have the surgery performed correctly the first time to reduce the chances of a revision being necessary. Each subsequent procedure becomes more difficult due to scar tissue, three-dimensional healing, and shrink wrappage of the skin. Even when the surgery is performed correctly, every patient heals differently.  As a result, they may or may not require a small revision down the road. Thank you and I hope this helps.

Dr. Nassif

 

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

The most important question I would have in this situation is "why do you ask?".  Patients that have realistic expectations and a good outcome for surgery generally only need one surgery. Although, with age the nose may change and a revision surgery may then be contemplated. Secondly, a patient may have had realistic expectations but not such a great outcome. In this case it is important to understand what went wrong and either change surgeons or the surgical approach. Lastly, if a patient did not have realistic expectations but actually a good result from surgery, they should probably do nothing and enjoy their improved look.

Gary Motykie, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Revision rhinoplasty numbers

+1

There is no absolute number to how many times a revision rhinoplasty can be performed. The limiting factors typically relate to your skin type, scarring and available cartilage and bone underneath. Minor revisions are not uncommon. However, major revisions can result in more scar tissue and less than optimum results especially with repeated surgeries. It is also important to wait at least a year from the previous surgery to allow the tissues to normalize before they are traumatized again. Make sure you see an expert in revision rhinoplasty before undertaking any additional procedures.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

How Many Rhinoplasties Can One Patient Undergo?

+1

I have performed Rhinoplasty and Revision Rhinoplasty for well over 20 years and have been the tenth surgeon to do a revision Rhinoplasty on a model from Paris who had the prior surgeries elsewhere.  Each and every patient will be different based on what was done during the previous Rhinoplasties and the condition of the skin, cartilage, blood supply and internal scar tissues. 

I will tell you that, IMHO, revision Rhinoplasty is a quantum level more technically challenging than primary Rhinoplasty and there needs to be pinpoint focus of what's trying to be accomplished.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

You raise a good question. Revision rhinoplasty is more complicated than an initial operation. There is no official hard and fast rule as to a maximum number of times one can undergo rhinoplasty. However, it is well accepted that each subsequent rhinoplasty entails a greater degree of uncertainty, longer duration of swelling, and unpredictable healing among other issues. If you are considering seeking evaluation for revision rhinoplasty, find a board-certified specialist (Facial Plastic Surgeon or Plastic Surgeon) that has experience with revision cases. Good luck.

James M. Pearson, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

How Many Rhinoplasties Can A Patient Have?

+1

Although 2/3rds of the rhinoplasties I do are revisions of work that was done before the patient was seen in our office, there is no absolute number of procedures that can be done on a nose. It depends on what was done during the previous surgeries and the physical findings present when considering another operation. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Rhinoplasties

+1

Ideally, you should only have to do this once. A second procedur is not that uncommon. So, there is no true limit but, the risk reward ratio goes down with multiple procedures

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Do it once and right

+1

When it comes to surgery, and a genera rule, one visit to the OR should be the rule. Therefore, choosing the right surgeon is important. Occasionally a second procedure is required when it comes to rhinoplasty.

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.