Will Revision Tummy Tuck Remove The Excess Skin Left Over From Previous Diastasis Recti Repair??

I am 8 weeks post op from full abdominoplasty with diastasis recti repair and umbilical hernia repair. My surgeon is surprised at the loose skin over the umbilicus and said I will likely require a revision abdominoplasty. The original surgery required the traditional horizontal incision as well as a shorter vertical incision to the umbilicus. I am very thin and have almost no body fat. The surgeon said there was not much skin to work with. Will a revision fix this or is it likely to recur?

Doctor Answers (7)

Revision of TT

+1

The photograph that you include with a question does not look entirely consistent with that reported operation you have had. I am not sure that I can see an incision around the navel which suggests to me that he did not have a classical full abdominoplasty.

 

Nonetheless what you have now is what you have now. When I see is a modest amount of excess skin in the upper abdomen, some excess in the lower abdomen, and an abdominoplasty incision that was too short as is evident by the dog ears on each end.

A properly performed abdominoplasty should correct these before you.

Best wishes


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Tummy tuck revision

+1

It is hard to tell based on your picture whether you really had a “full tummy tuck” done. Regardless, revisionary surgery will be beneficial, depending on what was done during  your 1st operation. I would suggest asking your surgeon for the specifics of what procedure was performed. If you have questions/concerns a 2nd opinion may be warranted.

Make sure you're working with a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 753 reviews

Revision TT

+1

In the photo, it doesn't look like any umbilical work was done the first time - this suggests that you might not have had a classic "full" abdominoplasty the first time, more of a modified or mini technique.

The appearance, IMO, could be improved by a re-do operation, with more undermining of the skin above the umbilicus, removal of more skin, and re-insetting of the umbilicus.  Best of luck!

Thomas Fiala, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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Revision abdominalplasty

+1

Yes, from the photo there is a fair amount of redundant skin.  You are not a candidate for any liposuction, a much more aggressive skin undermine and advancement of the skin is required for a flat result.  The umbilicus will need to be released to advance the flap as a unit.  You may want a second opinion with a board ceertified plastic surgeon. Good luck

Rodger Wade Pielet, MD (in memoriam)
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

You need another tummy tuck

+1

It seems that you don't have a scar around your navel, and very little tightening was done of the skin ,maybe this was a mini tuck ??? Scar also seems to high. You need to see a board certified plastic surgeon for a second opinion

Gloria de Olarte, MD
Pasadena Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Will Revision Tummy Tuck Remove The Excess Skin Left Over From Previous Diastasis Recti Repair??

+1

The posted photo shows many issues. Too short of length in the horizontal dimension causing bilateral minor dog ear deformities. Poor dissected or to short of a dissection of the supra umbilical flap, if any was done. Appears as a mini tummy tuck result. Yes a Full skin flap TT is the better option. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Revision

+1

Revision should fix this.  I would recommend a repeat of the full abdominoplasty, with a longer horizontal scar.  Otherwise, you will most likely wind up with "Dog Ears"  

Daniel P. Markmann, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

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