Second Revision Rhinoplasty for Bulbous and Drooping Tip? (photo)

Hi, I have had two previous rhinoplasty operations, the first reduced the hump, the second made my nose slightly smaller overall, however I still feel like my tip is slightly bulbous and long/droopy, especially when I smile. I believe I have a hanging columella, even prior to surgery, I did not ask my previous surgeons to fix this as I didn't know much about rhinoplasty at that time. Can my nose be improved? Can the tip be more refined? Do I in fact have a hanging ? Is this easy to fix? Thank you.

Doctor Answers (4)

Second Revision for Bulbous, Drooping Tip

+2

Your tip can be improved with a limited revision to refine your result and lift your hanging columella. It is not easy but can be done by an experienced surgeon.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Hanging columella?

+2

Stop!!  I do not think that you have a hanging columella and I think overall from the photos that you posted that things like very nice.  No nose is perfect and yours is pretty close. I would leave it alone.  Enjoy the nose for the rest of your life! 

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Another revision

+2

Overall the shape of your nose is nice.  You may be able to get slight improvement with another surgery but the risk/reward may not be worth it.

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

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Tip Reduced, Hump Removed, Hanging Columella

+1

   The tip looks very nice and the hump has been reduced as you have mentioned.  The hanging columella can be addressed with possible caudal septal trim and anchoring of footplates/medial crura to the septum, depending upon exam.  However, I would agree with others that the columella is not particularly obtrusive and may not be worth intervention.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 194 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.