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How is a Revision Done? Is It Painful? How Much Does It Cost? Will It Look More Natural over Time? (photo)

How can I make my belly button look more natural? Is this amount of swelling normal 9 weeks post op?

Doctor Answers (3)

Good reason to wait on this surgical result.

+1

I don't charge my patients for scar revisions. However your scar is still biologically active based on the pink color in the incision. My advice would be to wait until this biologic activity has completely subsided.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Boggy belly button bothers Betty but bodes better, but black and blue brings bad blow

+1

The belly button acts like a tree with roots and canopy. In tummy tuck, an incision releases the belly button from all its skin attachments (canopy) in preparation for being moved. It then relies on the root blood supply from the remaining tissues connecting it to the body. If the dissection has been aggressive or if a prior belly button hernia has been repaired, the blood supply via the root may be inadequate. This would led to minor delayed healing with persistent swelling which would eventually go away, but if significant black and blue is seen, partial or complete loss of the belly button is possible.

John Cassel, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

How is a Revision Done?

+1

 A revision is a vague generic term that can cover anything from a complete redo of an operation done under anesthesia in an operating room to a minor correction of the end of  a scar that can be done with just local anesthesia. 

Cost and discomfort will of course vary. Your own surgeon, for example, will probably charge considerably less than a new surgeon. 

I would allow a full 6 months before considering a second procedure to permit the healing to be close to complete and the swelling, if any, to resolve. 

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.