How Soon Can I Have a Revision to Correct Rippling?

I had breast augmentation 1 month ago. I am 5'6 113lbs and was advised to get subglandular silicone implants. I went with 270cc as I wanted a natural look. I feel I was ill advised on the subglandular implant. I have a lot of rippling in the midline area which is not natural looking. My doctor said this will improve but from what I have read rippling in thin patients does not improve. How long do I have to wait before a revision to submuscular?

Doctor Answers (13)

3 Months Before Revision after Breast Augmentation

+1

   3 months should pass before considering breast augmentation.  A switch from the subglandular to the submuscular plane should improve the results.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

Correction Following Breast Augmentation

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I am sorry to hear about your dissatisfaction and rippling following your breast augmentation. The location and type of  implant can certainly have an impact on how natural the result.  It sounds like you are quite thin, and if your implants are showing signs of rippling now, I doubt that the situation will improve with time.  Typically someone with your build would get a good result with a submuscular implant placement.  You are probably still experiencing some swelling from the procedure, and ideally should wait a few months for this to resolve before considering a revision.  Good luck to you. 

Steven L. Ringler, MD, FACS
Grand Rapids Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Rippling and revision

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You probably need to wait 3-4 months before undergoing a revision.  It may be better to place the implants under the muscle and possibly adding Strattice.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Submuscular Placement Of Implants May Improve Rippling

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Moving your implants to a submuscular location MAY correct your rippling.  I tend to always place implants in this location unless patients have a good deal of breast tissue pre-op.  If you can wait, I probably would wait another 2-3 months.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Rippling after Breast Augmentation

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Rippling is directly related to thin soft tissue coverage, subglandular implant position and more common with saline implants. You did not mention what type of implants you recieved but if saline was used, you might get some improvement with silicone. If you are extremely thin, then a submuscular position would be better. As others have said, I would give it time before you do anything. It is too early in the healing process to make any decisions or have any intervention.

Scott R. Brundage, MD
Grand Rapids Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Breast Implant Rippling

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It would be best to wait six months if possible.  Depending on the size and type of implant and your soft tissue coverage, things may change over time.  Larger implants with poor tissue coverage are more prone to traction rippling which may or may not improve.  Some textured implants soften their tissue adherence over time and the rippling may improve.  Time will tell and do not rush to a revision yet.

Charles R. Nathan, MD
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Rippling with implants

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Seeing the rippling this soon will not improve with time.  I would wait about 3 months to allow the edema and inflammation from the first surgery subside.  You have very thin covering over the implants to show this so soon.  I assume you have a slight ptosis or droop to your breasts that would cause your surgeon to go with the subglandular placement.

Thomas P. McHugh, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Correcting Rippling after Breast Augmentation

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Deciding between submuscular breast augmentation  (implant under the muscle) and subglandular breast augmentation (implant on top of the muscle, under the breast tissue) depends on several factors including patient anatomy and overall aesthetic goals. For patients who have adequate breast tissue and desire a more natural looking appearance, subglandular augmentation is a good option.

I generally tell my patients to wait 3-6 months after surgery to assess the final result to determine if future surgery is necessary, After that time, if the rippling persists there are several options that may improve your result. These options include a "site switch" in which the implants can be moved from above the muscle to below the muscle. This would provide more soft tissue coverage of the implant to decrease the rippling and visibility of the implant. Fat grafting or tissue substitutes can also help provide additional coverage and improve rippling. All the best. Good Luck.  

Scott Farber, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Revisional surgery to correct rippling after breast augmentation should not be done before six months.

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Rippling at one months will probably not improve with time. However, at one month the breasts are still actively healing from the operation. One should wait six months before revisional surgery and if lucky the rippling may improve.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Subglandular rippling

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Rippling occurs in part from insufficient tissue coverage over the implant.  That is one reason why most plastic surgeons prefer to place implants in the sub-muscular position - it adds another layer of coverage over the implant and minimizes the chance of seeing/feeling ripples.  If you already have rippling then I doubt that it will improve over time.  In my opinion, there is no minimum time that you need to wait in order to correct this problem with a second surgery to place the implants in the submuscular position.

Edwin C. Pound, III, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.