Revision After 6 Months?

I had an augmentation 6 months ago and have been unhappy with the results since. They absolutely look natural but I do not feel they fit my body frame. I had 190cc of natural tissue after 2 kids and received 300cc silicone, mentor moderate. I absolutely loved how the sizers looked but that is not what I got look wise at all. I am 31 yo, 5'7" and 140 pounds. Is it worth the cost and time to revise to 400-450cc? It is only 1/3 less to revise if I do it within the next few weeks.

Doctor Answers (6)

Revisionary Breast Surgery to Increase Breast Size?

+1

Ultimately, it will be a very personal decision whether or not to proceed with revisionary breast surgery to increase breast size. Only you, certainly not online consultants, will be able to determine whether or not revisionary surgery will be worth the trouble. If you do decide to proceed with surgery, careful communication with your plastic surgeon will be one of the “keys” to success.  In my practice, I find the use of goal pictures very helpful during this communication process. Show your plastic surgeon what you would like to achieve and what you consider to be too big or too small.

 Best wishes.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 719 reviews

Be careful about switching to larger size after breast augmentation if the first result is good.

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If your breasts were soft and natural after breast augmentation I would caution you against an operation to take you to a larger size. You run the risk of having aesthetic problems more significant than a small volume difference

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Changing Breast Implant Size

+1

The most common reason for a breast implant revision is usually to change size because the first ones were too small.   If you decide to upgrade ensure that you go large enough to make noticeable difference.  You can use sizers in your surgeons office or the rice test at home to help estimate the size you want.  Its important that you don't overdo it and go too big for what your tissues will allow.  So make sure you discuss this with your plastic surgeon.

Adam Hamawy, MD
Princeton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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It's Perfectly OK to Change Your Breast Implant Size

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I find that when patients choose their implant size preop, if they are unhappy with their postoperative size, then usually they've picked too small.  I recommend to these patients that if they want to change their size, consider at least 20% larger to make sure the size increase is at least noticeable.  That being said, using the rice test (filling a nylon stocking with a certain amount of rice) can be a very useful tool in determining which size to go with.  Mentor also makes a sizing kit that some plastic surgeons have which can be helpful, too.  Finally, keep in mind that there are risks anytime you have surgery.  You could develop a capsular contracture, infection, or bleeding complication, even with a minor implant size change.  So make sure it's worth it if you change.  Good luck!

Anthony Youn, MD
Detroit Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Revision augmentation

+1

I think it is a good idea to see how much more volume will make you happy. I usually use the rice/baggy test as well.  Good lucha

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Revision After 6 Months

+1

I would suggest a "rice test", filling some stockings with raw rice, and seeing the volume that it takes to get you to the size you like. 

As a rule, anything less than 100 cc of added size is not worth the effort or money for the amount of change, but the volumes you  are considering should make a noticeable difference. 

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.