Is reusing Restylane injection safe?

I got restylane filler to smooth out my nose hump on 9 Jan.Doctor used only 0.3ml and 0.2ml is still remaining and he said I can come back for touch up within 2 weeks to reuse the remaining filler.I'm going on 23 Jan to get the remaining filled in.Will it cause any problems? Can it be reused without any problems?

Doctor Answers (8)

Re-using filler

+1
Here are 3 separate studies showing the safety of re-injecting unused filler in the same patient. The science says it is safe.

Bellew SG, Carroll KC, Weiss MA, Weiss RA. Sterility of stored nonanimal, stabilized hyaluronic acid gel syringes after patient injection. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;52:988–90.

Davis K, Bottone EJ, Lucas D, Lebwohl M. Sterility of refrigerated injectable collagen syringes after injection of patient. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992;27:959–61.

Culligan PJ, Koduri S, Heit MH, Rackley R, Thomson RB, Schwabe L, et al. The safety of reusing injectable collagen: A multicenter microbiological study. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2002;13:232–4.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Is reusing Restylane injection safe?

+1
I don’t recommend using a filler once it’s opened, you can run a risk of bacterial contamination. Its best you consult with your doctor before re-injecting an open product 

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

It is probably safe but I don't do it

+1
I agree that it is safe when carefully done, however, I don't do this in my office.  I just think the risk (even though minimal) of infection or getting someone else's vial or having a label fall off doesn't justify keeping the product.  In most patients we can find another area that they want enhanced with the small amount of filler that is left over.  

Marilyn Pelias, MD
New Orleans General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

You might also like...

Fillers in a "doggie-bag"

+1
Facial fillers were never designed to be used after the original injection procedure. Sadly, the practice of holding left-over fillers until another day may seem to be an attractive option, but you're essentially agreeing to have your face injected with a material that is now contaminated with bacteria and has been on a shelf serving as the perfect pertri-dish for the growth of that bacteria since the time of your first injection. Although it may seem like a great way to save some money, imagine the difficulty and expense of developing and abscess in the face, lip or nose.

A much better approach......I never waste fillers.....quite the contrary. My patients purchase the entire syringe, so why not use it?! Just do so during one office visit. A skilled plastic surgeon can always utilize the remainder of any filler. After completing the treatment in the desired area....move onto another area. Why not give you the most out of your investment...safely?!

I first treat the area(s) of most concern to the patient and if there happens to be a bit of filler remaining in the syringe, I ask the patient if they would mind my using it in an area in which I think they'd benefit. The results are safe, predictable and always a pleasant surprise to the patient to get a bit more "bang for the buck".

Keep in mind the following: You're paying hard-earned money for great results. Don't compromise and certainly don't let your physician compromise you. If your getting left-over fillers or other injectables, find a reputable Plastic Surgeon Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery with experience in the types of treatment your looking for. Better to find one now and avoid the complications rather than find one after the complication arises. Best of luck!

Jonathan R. Fugo, DO
Newburgh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Reusing Restylane

+1
The official answer is "don't do it"  but many practices store partial syringes with the needle removed and the sterile cap replaced with as much sterile technique as possible for varying amounts of time.  I have not known patients to have issues with this practice in the past.  It's really a judgment call on the part of your doctor and yourself.  2 days' worth of prophylactic antibiotics would be a good decision if you used to your partial syringe.

Chase Lay, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Is it safe to reuse restylane

+1
I believe that this is safe if the needle has been removed and the cap returned right after usage . A new needle would be used at the next visit. I would not store this forever but I do not expect any problem after a few weeks. 

Jo Herzog, MD
Birmingham Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Is reusing Restylane injection safe?

+1
I do not recommend this practice. There is a real, though small, risk of infection. Even though the needle can be changed and the product carefully stored, there is reflux in the syringe during injection that can introduce bacteria and other skin contaminants into the syringe. This is a problem if the syringe then sits on the shelf for weeks to months. More importantly, even with the best inventory controls there is a risk of mixing up the syringes or having the wrong patient's syringe used at your followup appointment.

Your safety is paramount. I am not willing to put my patients at risk of a serious medical issue that is easily avoidable by not reusing syringes.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Studies have shown that Restylane is safe to store at least 9 months after it was used initially

+1
After using a portion of a syringe of Restylane, it is safe to store up to nine months without risk of infection if the needle is changed out before storing and replaced again before using it.  Some docs will give to the patient but I always do the storage myself to ensure proper temperatures (room temp) and sterility is followed.  Steve Weiner, MD, Facial Plastic Surgeon, Destin, Florida.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.