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Retin A for Wrinkles Around the Mouth?

I am a 40 year old east Indian female. I was on birth control pills for about 10 years. I stopped taking them last year, and I lost quite a lot of my hair and lost weight. I have used Retin A regularly for 15 years. I now have smile creases. Will Retin A correct this in time or should I have injection fillers? Is it a good thing to use topical creams for wrinkles regularly?

Doctor Answers (4)

Retin-A might help with wrinkles around mouth

+4

Hello,

While Retin-A may help wrinkles around the mouth don't inadvertently lick your lips with it on. I am pretty sure you aren't supposed to ingest it.


Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Retin-A uses

+3

Retin-A has been available via prescription for decades.  When a medication is on the market for this period, it generally indicates that it is "tried and true".  It is accepted among dermatologists and plastic surgeons alike that Retin-A helps to alleviate fine lines.  Coarse wrinkles, however, require a filler or surgery.  Sometimes coarse lines (glabellar furrows or wrinkles in the brow between the eyes) respond to Botox with or without a filler.  Smile lines are rarely treated with Botox, but may do well with a filler.  Good luck!

Jason R. Hess, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Retin A for fine lines, Fillers for deeper lines

+3

Retin A is a great way to maintain your skin-- studies show that regular use of Retin A helps with fine lines and wrinkles.  They also help build collagen over time.  They are safe, FDA approved and have been studied for over 40 years.  

For smile creases and deeper lines, though, fillers are much more effective.  Hyaluronic acid fillers such as juvederm and restylane are safe and effective for smile lines.

No matter what you choose, make sure you wear a sunscreen during the day.  Good Luck!

-Dr. Mann

Margaret Mann, MD
Cleveland Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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