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Restricted Head Movement After Otoplasty?

Hi, I'm David from NYC. I had otoplasty (conchal setback with cartilage removal and antihelical fold creation in both ears) a couple of days ago. Since the operation I am noticing a pulling sensation behind the ears. When I rotate my head to either side I feel the pulling sensation with discomfort, so I can only rotate about 45 degrees. I get the same feeling when really raising my eyebrows and fully smiling. Is this just due to the sutures and the incision healing or should I be worried?

Doctor Answers (3)

Head Restriction After Otoplasty

+2

Early on, otoplasty can create swelling and mild discomfort.  This can create a similar situation as described.  In addition, sutures are typically used during the procedure which can also create a sensation of pulling.  Consider speaking with your surgeon to ensure there is nothing abnormal with your procedure.  


Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Restricted Head Movement after Otoplasty?

+2

Thank you for the question. Given that you have had surgery recently, your  description of the sensations/discomfort your experiencing  does not seem concerning.  In other words, I do not think that you have much to worry about. For more precise advise/reassurance you may want to contact your plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

Restricted Head Movement After Otoplasty

+1

These sensations are totally consistent with the typical incisions and suturing techniques used for this type of procedure.  You should stop "testing" the ways you can elicit these pulling feelings, and let your ears heal uneventfully!

Lyle M. Back, MD
Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.