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Resorption from Silicone Chin Implant?

Hi guys, so I'm considering a chin implant however I have a few worries about resorption. I read that 1-2mm resorption is common. If I get a chin implant and have it removed, will my chin bone be smaller? Will the muscle and skin sag or be different than before? I've noticed different answers from different surgeons. Some say it's not noticeable, some say that the chin bone will be smaller after removal, and some say it is/isn't preventable.Thanks for your time helping :)

Doctor Answers (5)

Silastic Chin implant

+1

 A minimal amount of bone resorption does occur which is noticeable only when the implant is removed. It does not affect the cosmetic or functional part of the mandible, it is just an observation that we see when removing an implant.  If the implant has to be removed, the tissues will just be sutured back to their normal position and the skin and muscle will not sag.

Web reference: http://chincheekimplantsseattle.com

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Bone resorption after chin implantation

+1

I've not encountered bone resorption being an actual clinical issue in my patients. There may be very minimal thinning of the bone with large implants and implants placed high on the chin bone where the bone is thinner.

The main thing to consider with removing an implant is to make sure that the overlying muscle layer is reconstituted properly with sutures. With large implant removals you also want to consider proper skin redraping afterward.

You can read more about chin implantation (and see what they look like) at my web reference link below.

Web reference: http://www.rhinoplastyinseattle.com/rhinoplasty-treatments/chin-augmentation

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Silicone Chin Implant Bone Resorption

+1

The concern about silicone chin implant bone resorption is more theoretical than having any aesthetic significance. It can be seen in very large implants and, particularly those implants that are placed too high on the chin bone, which has a thinner cortex near the tooth roots. But for the typically-sized chin implant most patients will not experience pressure resorption of the underlying bone. (implant settling) In removal of a chin implant the more pertinent concern is what the overlying soft tissue will do (i.e., will it sag) not whether the chin will look smaller.

Web reference: http://www.eppleyplasticsurgery.com/chin.html

Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Bone Resorption with Chin Implants

+1

Your question is a valid one and the answer is yes some amount of bone resorption behind the implant will occur over time.  This is evident when removing an implant or replacing one.  I have never seen it be cosmetically significant since the fibrous capsule the body grows around the implant maintains a fair amount of the chin projection.  I would not let this be a deciding factor to having a chin implant as the cosmetic benefits to a well done augmentation are incredible.  Ask the questions of your surgeon and he or she should be able to show you pictures and expalin these issues to you.  Best of luck......Dr D.

Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Resorption from Silicone Chin Implant?

+1

     The chin implant may cause bone resorption, particularly in older patients.  However, placement of chin implant and removal thereafter usually creates little change if the soft tissue is resuspended properly.  You could have Radiesse injected to give you an idea of the look without having an implant placed.   You could also consider osseous genioplasty, but this has its own set of risks.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials and look at before and after photo galleries to determine who can help you achieve your goals.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA 

Web reference: http://www.hughesplasticsurgery.com/Chin-Implant.php

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 147 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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