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Can I Be Resistant to Botox and Other Fillers?

Since my last question I have 35 units of Xeomin to my Galbella and forehead, it worked worderfully and alsmost immediately, however 1 month later and it is already starying to wear off?

Doctor Answers (10)

Resistant to Botox

+1
Sometimes you need to have more toxins injected which we don’t always want, but is reality when you do this enough times. For clarity, Xeomin is a neurotoxin, like Botox and Dysport; fillers are Restylane, Juvéderm, and Belotero, among others.

We know from having done this now for a long time that sometimes more toxin is needed in one set of injections than we used previously. This may be due to a lot of things, but no one has adequately described this so know that this can happen. In most everyone out there, the toxins all last about the same amount of time, anywhere from 4-6 months. That does mean sometimes it will last less, and that sometimes it will last more.

Consult with a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon for the best results.


Nashville Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Can I Be Resistant to Botox and Other Fillers?

+1

You may need more units applied to the area. Xeomin that was injected may have soften the lines but if you have strong muscle movement, it would not have provided full correction to have fully paralyzed the muscle. 

Best of luck 

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Resistant to Botox and Other Fillers? #Xeomin

+1

Xeomin, which you had injected, is a neuromodulator similar to Botox an Dysport.  Fillers include Radiesse, Restylane, Perlane, Juvederm and Belotero (those are the most common ones).  Both fillers and neuromodulators are referred to as "Injectables."

Anything is possible but I wouldn't assume that you're resistant to Xeomin just yet.  Are you sure it was 35 units?  Do you know how fresh the solution was, or if it was reconstituted correctly?  Xeomin requires more time and/or shaking to be reconstituted as the product is often stuck underneath the cap, resulting in a weaker concentration that one might assume.

Resistant?  Possible, but not likely and, either way, too early to say.

I hope that this helps and good luck,

Dr. e

Alan M. Engler, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 155 reviews

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Xeomin and Botox neurotoxins work well

+1

In our office, we have found Xeomin to be long lasting in patients as compared to Botox injectable neurotoxin.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

Resistant to Botox?

+1

  You can develop antibodies to Botox.  This is far less common with Xeomin which makes it a superior product.  Botox and Xeomin are not fillers.  It is possible that your Xeomin dose needs to be tweaked for best effect.

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Resistance to Botox and dermal fillers

+1

There is no 'resistance to dermal filler' but patient might be allergic to dermal fillers -products used to restore lost tissue volume.

Botox, Dysport,Xeomin on the other hand are all products of Botulinotoxin type A (BTA). They work by breaking nerve impulse conduction pathway to a muscle which responsible for creating skin creases by constant contraction.

3% of patients develop resistance to protein stabilisers of BTA, Patients simply start producing antibodies to them and BTA does not have chance to start acting in the muscle. In another words patients do not get the desired result irrespective of their BTA dose. Xeomin is BTA without such proteins hence it is belived it does not cause resistance. Longevity of the effect of the BTA , however, can depend on dose used, musle bulk of the patient, level of physical activity ( being in a GYM everyday will shorten the effect of BTA), certain drugs can interact with its efficacy ( like certain antibiotics).

Alexandra Chambers, MD
London Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Xeomin Resistance

+1

An actual "resistance" to one of the neuromodulators is quite rare. There are reports of patients making antibodies to one of the prtein components in Botox or Dysport. Xeomin is a "naked" neuromodulator, and does not have this potentially antigenic prtotein component. I have treated several patients with this concern in my practice with excellent results. You may need more units injected as the number used was on the "light" side for treating forehead and glabellar lines.

Jeffrey Fromowitz, MD, FAAD
Boca Raton Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Rare for this to happen, most likely you need more units of Xeomin

+1

Thank you for the question.

Botox is not a filler it is a neurotoxin and is used to relax muscles of the face, rather than fill depressions.  Xeomin is the latest neurotoxin to have been FDA cleared and new to the market. It is free of complexing proteins, because of that it has slightly different characteristics. Patents in my practice typically describe it as having a quicker onset. Sometimes patients require more units based on their specific anatomy.    

Best,

Dr. Lorenc

Z. Paul Lorenc, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Resistance to Botox and fillers is not common.

+1

Patients can form antibodies to different neurotoxins like Botox, Dysport and Xeomin. Typically these patients never have a response. It sounds like you either needed more units or you have very active muscles that were appropriately partially paralyzed but started to fire early.

Laurie Casas, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Xeomin for frown lines

+1

Xeomin or any other form of neurotoxin can wear off sooner when injected the first time especially if smaller amounts were used. I encourage my patients to use the appropriate amounts and to cover areas outside their areas of concern. the problem is that when Botox or Xeomin stops a certain muscle from making a line, the surrounding muscles can start to compensate and can produce the undesired lines. u may not be resistent to it, its just that u need more units

Misbah Khan, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.