How Can I Remove the Bony Lumps That Formed After Hitting My Head Years Ago?

I hit my head very hard when I was around 5 years old and got those two bumps on my forehead. I am currently 15 now and they haven't gone away. The doctors told me they are calcified bones and I should worry about them. They don't hurt or anything but it makes me look very embarrassing. I heard incision above my hairline could be done and shave them down, is that true? Also I'm concern about the cost, few hundred? few thousand dollars?

Doctor Answers (2)

Here is a little test.

+1

Lokust

It is possible to have the bone rasped down.  I think a bigger issue is whether you have body dysmorphic disorder(BDD) or not.  The bumps you are showing are subtle.  They are generally not something that would be considered disfiguring by most.  So here is the test.  How many hours a day to you think about these bumps.  If you think about it for hours a day or are preoccupied by these thoughts, this would be consistent with BDD.  Do you avoid social situations because you believe that others are talking about or making jokes about you because of these issues.  This is also consistent with BDD.  BDD does benefit from psychotherapy although my experience is that most consulting the cosmetic surgeon who have BDD are much more interested in having cosmetic surgery than psychotherapy.  It is critical that your cosmetic surgeon clearly understands your concern before undertaking surgery on this and less is more.


Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Bumps on forehead

+1

The calcifications that you mention are similar to frontal bone osteomas. These can be rasped chisled or burred down. The closer the skin incision is to the target the easier it is for the surgeon. Specialized equipment is needed and therefore it is difficult without seeing them to predict costs. Removing them is purely elective

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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