Is There Something I Can Do to Relieve Breast Pain from "Post Surgical Change"?

I had a minor lumpectomy 10 years ago to remove a benign cyst. It was done by a general surgeon at a small local hospital. Approx 2 months post surgery, a lump reappeared, which has always been very mobile & checked biannually with mammography & ultrasound. This lump has always been locally tender, but in past 3 months the entire breast has become painful, (cannot lay on that side). Radiologist advised this is due to "post surgical change & fat necrosis". Is there a way to relieve the pain?

Doctor Answers (4)

Breast pain

+2

Sometimes patients develop pain in their breast after surgery. This can be related to nerve irritation at a minimum. You should get this checked out by your breast surgeon.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast Pain after Lumpectomy

+2

The cause of breast pain such as you described can be difficult to diagnose and difficult to treat. I suggest that you see a breast surgeon (not just a general surgeon) for a thorough workup. Re-excision of the mass is a likely next step.

David Greenspun, MD, MSc
New York Plastic Surgeon

Breast lumpectomy became painful

+2

Given your description of a recurrent mass associated with pain, I would likely advise you to undergo re-excision for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

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Breast pain

+2

Removal of a cyst should not cause another lump to appear. The radiologist is concerned enough to do biannual mammogram and sonogram. Therefore it needs to be removed.

Pain in the breast "MASODYNIA" is difficult to treat, see your gynecologist and endocrinologist for that.

If the pain is nerve pain due to surgery ask your family physician about prescribing "LYRICA"

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

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