What's the Best Way to Reduce Scarring from Spider Vein Removal Around Nose?

I had a spider vein removal around my nose and it left me with the veins plus scars around the nose. What can I do to reduce them? Is there a laser free way of reducing them? I am afraid of further damage.

Doctor Answers (7)

Vein Treatment

+1

I still like laser for vein removal on the nose.  I have treated hundreds, maybe thousands, and have not seen 1 scar.  I think the choice of laser or the energy may not have been dialed in properly.  I like the 532nm KTP laser, the VBEAM, and 1064 yag, an even IPL.


Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Treating scars and vessels around the nose

+1

Greetings to you in Miami~

It's difficult to say what the ideal treatment would be without seeing exactly what is going on on your nose.  Laser treatment is a great way to treat vessels on the nose and can yield excellent results...but know that even in the best cases the small veins around the nose do come back.  This is treatment, NOT cure.  If you have indentations on the nose from previous treatment or large pores you may consider a peel like Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) or some type of resurfacing or fractional laser treatment.  (treatment for the scars will not address veins however)

Hope this helps.

Good luck

Dr. Grant Stevens      

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

How to Remove Veins on the Nose?

+1

Hi Miami.  We would recommend lasers as the best way to treat these veins.  Even though you have had a bad experience, the proper laser in the proper hands is going to give you the best result. 

As Dr. Crippen points out and we concur, the 532 (KTP), 595 (Pulsed dye) or 1064 (Nd:Yg) lasers are the best for your situation.  

We would not use, nor do we recommend IPL for this treatment.  It is an inferior technology and is the reason for many burns for this type of treatment.  IPL is very, very difficult to use on an area such as the nose because the surface area of the light device is too large and the contours too small.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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Spider veins around nose

+1

 VeinWave is the best way. Hands down. Great results. No staining. One Treatment. 

Timothy Mountcastle, MD
Ashburn General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Veins on the nose

+1

I believe that IPL is a good way to eliminate or greatly decrease the appearance of these vissible vessles on the nose.  Scarring is highly unliky.

Victoria Karlinsky, MD
Manhattan General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Veins around nose are difficult (but not impossible) to treat.

+1

Unlike other tiny facial vessels, those on the side of the nose (the nasal ala) are high-flow (arteriolar) in nature. Most other facial vessels are tiny veins (low-flow) that are easily treated by laser. Other techniques can be used on these as well (such as IPL--intense pulsed light, or PDL--pulsed dye laser), but when treating only a few tiny vessels I prefer the KTP laser.

For the ones you are asking about, even the KTP laser will shrink or scar the overlying skin and may not easily seal the vessels that are "pounding" with your arterial blood pressure. More energy and more than one treatment may be necessary. If a needle can be stuck into the vessel, Sclerotherapy may actually work better than laser. Cat's whisker electrocautery can also effectively cauterize these difficult vessels.

When they are maximally treated, a bit of Dermabrasion in the area of the (mild) scars or textural irregularity can help to improve these areas. Laser resurfacing also works, but is "overkill" for this technique in such a small area where Dermabrasion is as effective for lower cost.

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.