Recovery from revision of breast augmentation and small mastopexy?

How long for the recovery?

Doctor Answers (3)

Recovery After Breast Augmentation

+2

Each surgeon is different with how he or she manages patients after breast augmentation/mastopexy.

I use nerve blocks with long acting Marcaine (Exparel), and my patients have very little pain following breast augmentation. This eliminates most pain for about 72 hours. Generally, my patients take anywhere from 0-3 pain pills total in their recovery.

In my practice I see patients 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 1 year after breast augmentation. At two weeks postop, I tell patients that they can begin light exercise on the lower body only (e.g. hands free elliptical, elevated treadmill walking, leg extensions, calf raises, etc.) and at 1 month, they can resume normal activity. I ask patients to avoid bench press, pushups, and butterfly lifting for 2-3 months.

The most critical aspect of postoperative care is patient communication. I give all of my patients my personal cell number and regularly speak to patients about questions and concerns in the pre- and postoperative period.


Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Recovery after revision breast surgery depends on several things

+1
Revision of breast augmentation can involve many different procedures, each with its own implications for recovery. The mastopexy usually does not add a lot to the overall recovery. Exparel helps with discomfort for the first 3 days, but your surgeon will advise you an any restrictions of activity during recovery.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Recovery after breast surgery

+1
In general, patients should take it easy after breast surgery. I tell patients to avoid light aerobic activity for 3-4 wks and heavy lifting for 6-8 weeks.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.