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What Do You Recommend for One Sided Recurring Capsular Contracture? Cohesive Gels?

I have had my implants changed x3 in 6 yrs and most recently just had a capsulectomy on the right, with return of the capsule w/in 2 months. It is uncomfortable,hard,misshapen and ugly. What are my options?

Doctor Answers (6)

Recurrent capsular contracture

+1
Recurrent capsular contracture can be difficult to remedy. There are a number of things that can be tried, but nothing is for sure a sure thing. You may always get recurrent capsular contracture even years later. With that said, changing from a smooth implant to a textured surface implant, moving a subglandularly placed implant to a submuscular position and/or removing the implant and scar tissue capsule Round the implant and placing a new implant. Both saline and silicone gel implants can get encapsulated.
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Implant issues

+1

Multiple capsular contractures are difficult to deal with.  Some would suggest removing the entire capsule and placing the implant in a new pocket along with strattice, and others would suggest removing the capsule and implants and waiting a few months and then trying again.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Recurrent Capsular Contracture

+1

Hello,

I am sorry you have had such a difficult and unpleasant experience with breast augmentation.  In reality, both Drs Pozner and Rand are correct.  Dr Rand has made the assumption that all avenues have been thoroughly taken to prevent recurrance.  Dr Pozner is delineating how aggressive a surgeon has to be to try to erradicate recurrance.  In as few words as possible, capsular contracture is almost always associated with bacteria, and the environment they create around the implant called biofilm. Sources of contamination are usually the skin, the old implant, or remnants of the old capsule still in your body. Additionally, people who have occult infections like urinary tract infections can 'seed' the implants in your body with bacteria in your bloodstream after the surgery.

Every few years I have seen people like you come to my doorstep. If you have already had 4 surgeries (original plus 3 re-operations?), you have every right to call it quits; I usually tell people three strikes and you're out. However, if you are game for another surgery, you should be very thorough the next time, starting with possibly choosing another surgeon who is an expert in revision surgery.

I hope you can find happiness quickly.  Best of luck.

Web reference: http://www.drminniti.com

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Alloderm/Strattice

+1

Given that you have had recurrent capsular contracture, I would be inclined to perform complete capsulectomies, exchange your implants, and consider using an acellular dermal matrix product such as Alloderm or Strattice. These products have shown to reduce the rate of capsular contracture.

Westchester Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Recurrent capsular contracture

+1

I disagree with Dr. Rand's answer. I would like to get the full story on your previous procedures and medical history. Was a complete capsulectomy performed and a new implant placed? Was a drain used? Do you have a history of sinus, urinary tract or other infections that could have contributed to capsular contracture?  For the last few years we have been treating capsular contracture with complete capsulectomy, new implant and sometimes new position and Strattice placement.the data is excellent with zero recurrences at this time. 

Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Sometimes you need to just remove the breast implants and be done

+1

If you have gone to excellent plastic surgeons and are having recurrent capsules in 2 months, your body is telling you that it doesn't want the implants.  Hard as it may be to accept, you should consider just having them out.  Nothing is known that will change this course.

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.