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Recessed Chin, Is a Chin Implant the Right Way to Go? (Asian Male 18 Y.o.) (photo)

With something as big as plastic surgery, I want to be a 100% sure that I want to go through with it. As of now, I am very nervous about getting a chin implant. I've been doing a lot of research on realself, but have unfortunately read of many cases that have ultimately ended in removals which have made me very hesitant. I have attached pictures for review & advice, and was wondering if a chin implant looks right for me, and if there is a high possibility that I might not like the result.

Doctor Answers (11)

Recessed Chin, Is a Chin Implant the Right Way to Go? (Asian Male 18 Y.o.)

+1

 From the photos provided, your chin is quite weak.  I have performed Chin Augmentation, with a Chin Implant, many times in similar situations and find it highly effective.  There are aesthetics to facial beauty that are outlined in my book on the subject.  As long as these are followed in selecting the proper size/shaped chin implant...the appearance should definitely be improved.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Implant vs Sliding Genioplasty for very Short Chin

+1

Your facial profile shows that you would clearly benefit by chin augmentation. The question in your case is whether it should be done by an implant or a sliding genioplasty. The sliding genioplasty consideration is very relevant for you given your your young age and the magnitude of your chin deficiency. That decision must take into account other issues such as how your chin currently looks from the front and what amount of augmentation you desire. These factors can be determined by preoperative computer imaging. 

Barry L. Eppley, MD, DMD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Success of Chin Implant Surgery

+1

A chin implant will significantly improve definition and facial proportion. It has been many, many years since I've had to rerevise a chin implant after the operation. Look at a surgeon's results in patients like you.  

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Chin implant for recessive chin

+1
 A Silastic  chin implant is an excellent way to augment the chin area, and in experienced hands, has a very low complication rate.  Its also important to make sure during the consultation that you and your surgeon pick the right size and shape based on your needs at time of examination. A Silastic  chin implant is usually inserted through a submental approach, placed directly over the bone, and underneath the periosteum. The procedure can be performed under local anesthesia, if patients are able to tolerate the local  anesthetic injection. 

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Recessed Chin, Is a Chin Implant the Right Way to Go?

+1

Based on the photos that you've submitted, your profile could benefit from a chin implant. Complications can occur with any procedure. However, facial implants placed by an experienced plastic surgeon have a low risk of complications. Seek a consultation and ensure that you like and trust the surgeon and appreciate the results of numerous before and after photos. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Lone Tree Facial Plastic Surgeon

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Recessed Chin, Is a Chin Implant the Right Way to Go? (Asian Male 18 Y.o.)

+1

                         If your bite is correct, then a chin implant is probably reasonable.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of chin implants and facial procedures each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results. 

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Chin augmentation

+1

Chin implants will cause the bone to erode with time - which will cause your chin to recede and/or the implant to start to move.  Chin implants are good options, but for younger patients I tend to recommend a genioplasty (actually moving the chin bone forward itself).  Find a surgeon in your area who is trained in craniofacial surgery and discuss the options with him/her.

Jason J. Hall, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Chin Implant

+1

You are doing the right thing by doing you research.  The best thing is to have an in-person consultation so that a proper recommendation can be made.  Also, 3-D computer imaging where your photo is morphed during your consultation will help you visualize what you will look like with a chin implant.  Please consult with a board certified specialist in Asian faces who can assist you with achieving the result you seek.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Chin implant

+1

You need an in-person exam to determine what is best for you.  Assuming your bite is normal, a chin implant is a safe and effective way to build up your chin.  In my experience, removal is very rare.  Best wishes.

David Alessi, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Chin Implants

+1

Chin implants are more common than chin advancement and therefore is the way to go for your need. Like any surgery, there are risks which you will have to be aware of. These risks are not common but they happen once in a while. Most removal is as the result of lack of communication between patient and surgeon with regard to the size and shape of the implant. Expectations should be clear from the onset and here computer imaging will help. Patience with postoperative swelling and discomfort is of utmost importance.

Mohsen Tavoussi, MD, DO
Huntington Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.