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Are Rebates Based on Area or Syringe?

Two weeks ago I had Dysport to lift eyebrows and reduce crowsfeet. The promo was a $50 rebate from Dysport and $50 savings from the Dr. He suggested that I get another syringe in the same area for better results. I took his suggestion, thinking I would not only benefit, but I would receive an additional $50 from him $50 from Dysport. I was billed $600 and I'm only getting a $50 rebate. Should I have gotten the extra rebate and the same from the DR?

Doctor Answers (8)

Dysport Rebates

+1

All good feedback from panel members.  As explained, the $50.00 Medicis (Dysport) rebate is based upon the treatment and not amount of product being used.  If your physician was offering an additional incentive of a $50.00 discount at the time of the treatment, it would be a good idea to bring to his attention that this was not done. 


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Toxin rebates are usually for the re-visit

+1

Rebates really depend upon what the company offers.  Toxin rebates are usually for the re-visit.  With rebates on syringes, it may be a per syringe offer or a promotion from the doctor’s office.  The websites of these companies usually have details on any promotions that they are offering.  BOTOX usually has the count per unit, not the syringe.  But often fillers will count syringes for the rebalte.

Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Dysport Rebates - Does the amount used matter?

+1

No. The rebates from Medicis are based on "a treatment" and it does not matter how many cc, syringes, or units are used. 

Robert S. Bader, MD
Miami Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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$50 Rebate from Medicis...

+1

NO, the $50 rebate was offered by Medicis, the makers of Dysport.  It is only $50 per customer on the first visit.  As for the $50 discount offered by the doctor... it sounds like  it was only $50 off  for the visit no matter if you purchase 1 or 5 syringes. 

Hope this helps. 

 

Dr. Grant Stevens 

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Read the fine print on rebates for Dysport, Botox, Restylane, Juvederm.

+1

When you went in for your Dysport treatment, and the doctor discussed the $50 rebate from the company (Medicis) and his own optional additional $50 rebate, to me it sounds like you should have had $100 total off the treatmtent. That would equal $50 off from him at the time of the visit, and another $50 you only get back from Medicis usually after mailing in a receipt showing treatment. If after explaining all of that he suggested you get additional Dysport (on the same day, it sounds like you are saying), it would have been NICE of him to explain that there is no additional rebate. Dysport is actually not measured "by syringe" like the fillers (Restylane, Juvederm, etc) are--it is really measured by units used. So whether he added "a second syringe" is not really relevant, since in his head he's just adding units to the treatment.

He COULD have offered you a second $50 rebate from his own pocket, but he didn't. He SHOULD have made it clear that adding more to the treatment did not come with more discounts. The Medicis rebate is only $50 with each treatment, no matter how much you get... and only 3 months apart. They are trying to get business away from Botox by giving people incentives to try it for the first time.

Similar rebates are equally confusing about the fillers, so if you are going to get Restylane or Juvederm, read and understand the fine print carefully before you get your treatments. Good luck!

Jessica J. Krant, MD, MPH
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Dysport $50 Rebate

+1

The $50 rebate offered by Medicis is currently running May1 – June 30, 2011. This rebate applies to one treatment visit since the FDA recommends that botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatments not be performed less than three months apart. The manufacturers are therefore bound to comply with this three month time frame when offering rebate programs. Your doctor should be aware of these details.

The additional $50 rebate offered by the practice is his decision, and it was nice that he offered it to you.

Dysport and Botox are measured in “units” of activity, and dosed accordingly. The term “syringe” does not apply to these treatments, but would be more applicable when discussing soft tissue filler treatments. I don’t know how your initial treatment was performed, or what your doctor charges for Dysport; and you did not mention what you paid for your initial treatment. You did mention that your doctor recommended additional treatment for better results, but I don’t know what areas were subsequently treated. I can tell you that for most patients in my practice, $600 would buy treatment of both the frown lines and crow’s feet (and perhaps another small area); and I would anticipate a satisfactory result lasting on average for four months.

Kenneth Dembny, II, MD
Milwaukee Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

It is important to carefully understand the rebate program.

+1

In the heat of the moment, it is easy to hear one thing even if you are told another.  It is also important to study the rebate programs and carefully follow all the steps so your refund is accurately processed.  Keep copies of the materials you send in and mark your calendar to follow up if you have not received the rebate in a timely manner.  If you are having difficulties, let the doctor's office know because the company rep can look into a particular situation if need be.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Dysport Rebate

+1

The Medicis rebate for Dysport is valid for one treatment visit, so no matter how much is injected you can only get $50 back from Medicis. As far as the savings from the practice, this is their decision.

Sumit Bapna, MD
Columbus Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.