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Will a Rasping with Local Anesthesia Be Suitable for my Nose Bump?

Hey docs. So, I love my nose from the front. From the side, I have a small bump that I wish I didn't have. It is so small that I wouldn't get a whole surgery for it. If a minor surgery isn't an option, then I suppose I'll just live with it. I do crave a straight profile, though. Do you think a minor nose job with local anesthetic will suffice? Thank you. I live in the NY/NJ area.

Doctor Answers (12)

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Every #rhinoplasty is surgery regardless of anesthesia type

+1

Hi

don't think that a minor rhinoplasty is not a whole surgery. Rhinoplasty is surgery whether done in the hospital comfortably under anesthesia or whether someone does it in the office for you. Frankly taking short cuts and doing a rhinoplasty in the office with local anesthesia is like taking a short cut and many doctors do it to save cost but many times the results are poor due to the lack of good equipment, assistants, proper lighting, etc. Do it right or don't do it. 

Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Will a Rasping with Local Anesthesia Be Suitable for my Nose Bump?

+2

 Sounds like a slight reduction of the dorsal hump would indeed address the issue.  The doral hump can be cartilage, bone or both and would require tissue dissection in order to get the nasal rasp, or scalpel for cartilage removal, to that spot.  For that reason, in my opinion, a short duration general anesthesia with a protected airway to prevent you from aspirating blood from the nose is the most safe and therefore the preferred method of anesthesia with a Rhinoplasty.

Web reference: http://www.drfpalmer.com/Rhinoplasty.html

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Rhinoplasty under local anesthesia

+2

 Most humps on the nose are composed of both bone and cartilage. Rasping will simply remove only the bone not cartilage.  Shaving of the cartilage  will need to be performed.   When the hump is removed, the nose becomes flattened, and osteotomies will need to be performed. All rhinoplasty surgery in our  office are performed under general anesthesia with a board certified physician anesthesiologist for patient safety. Patient's simply cannot tolerate nasal surgery under local anesthesia.

Web reference: http://www.seattlefacial.com/photogallery/rhinoplasty_photos24.html

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Profile bump is usually a combination of bone and cartilage.

+2

A dorsal bump usually requires more than just rasping the bone. The cartilaginous septum cannot be rasped. Also the upper lateral cartilages sometimes need adjusting. I'm afraid it's almost never a simple problem.

Web reference: http://www.zubowicz.com/subpag,25-atlanta-rhinoplasty.htm

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Dorsal Hump

+2

It would be best to see pictures of your dorsal bump before making a recommendation.  If it were small enough, rasping can be done. 

Paramus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

There are no minor surgeries

+2

Don't minimize what  you have. There are many things to consider when having your nose done. See a well qualified experienced plastic surgeon and ask them in person. Advice over the internet is not appropriate for this, you need to be seen in person.

New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Taking down a nose bump

+2

The nose bump you describe can be treated with simple rasping or require more complex maneuvers with the cartilage being shaved and the bone broken. It all depends on the degree of your bump and whether it is bony, bony + cartilage, or cartilage only. A picture may help but a thorough exam with a rhinoplasty surgeon will give you the answer you are looking for.

Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Will a Rasping with Local Anesthesia Be Suitable for my Nose Bump?

+1

I don't see any attached photos. In general terms, there are two potential problems with just rasping a bump on the bridge. First, depending upon the size of the bump, rasping alone can create the appearance of any excessively wide nasal bridge from the front if not combined with osteotomies. Second, rasping can be expected to reduce the bone portion of the bump but is not effective at reducing the cartilage. In my experience, most bumps on the nasal bridge require reducing the bone and some cartilage as well as performing lateral osteotomies to close a potential "open roof."

Web reference: http://weberfacialplasticsurgery.com/rhinoplasty/

Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Will a Rasping with Local Anesthesia Be Suitable for my Nose Bump?

+1

Dear GirlWoman,

Thank you for your question.  It is difficult to tell without photos or physical exam what it is that you need.  If you truly have a dorsal hump or 'bump', then, reducing it is pretty straight forward, but can be done under conscious sedation or general anesthesia.  I do many of my rhinoplasty cases as a 'deep' conscious sedation in a surgery center, as opposed to general anesthetic because patients tend to wake up smoother from this.  However, you are still very comfortable during the entire procedure and do not feel pain.  Wrasping nasal bones under local anesthetic will be painful and not very controlled.

Best Wishes,

Pablo Prichard, MD

Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Rasping Nasal Hump Under Local Anesthesia

+1

Rasping of a nasal hump can be done under local anesthesia. First of all your surgeon needs to see the size your "small " bump. If there is any doubt, I've told patients like you that I would reduce the hump as much as possible without having to do osteotomies.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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