What are CC's?

I don't understand what CC's mean -- what cup size?

Doctor Answers (10)

BBA

+1
CC could refer to a unit of measure that is equivalent to mL.  It could else be a short form for capsular contracture.  What was the context?  


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Volume measurement

+1
Implants do not come in "cup sizes".  CC's stands for cubic centimeter.  It's a volume measurement and it's the same as ml's.  Not only do implants come in varying volumes (or cc's) they also come in different widths.  Based on your personal measurements and surgical goals, you can determine with your plastic surgeon what size implant would be best for you.

Mennen T. Gallas, MD
Katy Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Unit of measure

+1
A 'cc' is a unit of measure standing for cubic centimeter or a milliliter.  Breast implants come in cubic centimeter volumes.  An approximate rule of thumb is 150-200cc will boost one's size by a cup size.  This is a very loose approximation as this might be entirely true for patients of very tiny or very full stature.  The number of cc's to create a particular cup size for you can be estimated by placing various sizers in your bra at your doctor's office.  The Vectra imaging device (where available) can also be quite helpful in allowing you to visualize your finished appearance.

Janet Turkle, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

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What is a CC

+1
Breast implants are measured not by cup size, but by volume.  CCs are the units used to measure the volume of breast implants.  5 ccs is the same volume as one teaspoon; 15 ccs is a tablespoon, an ounce is about 28 ccs.  And a measuring cup (8 ounces) of fluid is about 238 ccs.

During your consultation for breast augmentation, try on different sizers (for example 250 ccs or 350 ccs) in order to get a feel for how many ccs are needed to get you the result you desire.

Good luck!

James N. Romanelli, MD, FACS
Long Island Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

CC's

+1
Thank you for your question. CC in Medicine stands for Cubic centimeter. It is the same as ml or milliliter.
It is the way to measure volume. I hope this helps.

Christine Rodgers, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Cc's

+1

A cubic centimeter (cc) is a metric measure of volume. There are just under 29 cc in a fluid ounce (English measure), so for example, an eight ounce glass of milk has 236 cc. 

There are no fixed definitions of cup size, so trying to equate it to cc's is not at all useful. In these Realself pages I read surgeons suggesting that a cup size increase can require from 100 to 250 cc of implant size. None of this is really completely predictable.  

Better than quoting cup size as a goal is to try on implants and your surgeon can use that info to choose an appropriate size to insert. 

All the best. . 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

What are cc's?

+1
I think you are referring to cubic centimeters which are the measuring units for implants. We measure breast tissue in gram weight,  I can well imagine how confusing this is for the patient even before we get to issues like implant profile, saline v silicone, etc!

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Breast Implant CCs

+1
In general, there is no medical definition for cup size. CCs is a unit of volume just like pennies are a unit of monetary value.

Women that have A/B cup sizes that want to be full C cups will require ~ 350ccs of a breast implant in the submuscular postion. Larger women may need larger implants and women post childbearing (weight gain and weight loss) may need larger implants.

A good understanding of your desires as well a an examination is very important to the selection of the right implant.

Best wishes 

George C. Peck, Jr, MD
West Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

What are cc's

+1
Most refer to cc's for volume.  Volume is one aspect of choosing implants.  I consider two factors when selecting implants for my patients:

1.Dimensional planning
2.Gel Implant Sizing system

Dimensional planning – The measurements of your chest wall are taken. Also, the breast dimensions including the height, width, and current dimensions of each breast form the basis of dimensional planning. Based on these measurements, the implant size is recommended. This will give you a unique breast implant that is suited for your body frame. However, there are some limitations of what size we can recommend. For instance, some implants may just be too big for a narrow chest wall. Your surgeon can review this with you during the consultation.

Gel Implant Sizing system – During the preliminary breast implant consultation, you will be provided with an option to “try on” a variety of implant shapes and sizes. You can also visualize the possible outcomes of your surgery which helps you to get that perfect size to give you the shape that you longed for. This way your preferences are known and you can then pick a range of implants that will “fit” just right to give a soft natural fuller look. Hope this helps.

Best wishes,

Dr. Basu 

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Breast Implant sizes and Bra cup sizes

+1
Breast implant sizes are measured in CCs (cubic centimeters) or MLs (millileters), one CC = one ML.  The average 12 oz. soda can is equal to 355 CCs or MLs.  Bra cup sizes, on the other hand, are not measured in scientific measurements - a Playtex C cup is not the same size as a Bally or Victoria Secret C cup. Further, the final cup size a patient will be, after a breast augmentation, is the sum of the implant size and her previous breast size combined. Because of this, it can be difficult to determine, with certainty, what size implant will result a particular cup size. If you have a non-padded bra in the size you would like to be, bring the bra to your consultation.  The surgeon can then have you try on the various sized implants to determine which would be best in your case.  Best wishes.

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.