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Radiesse Nodule Under Eyes

I had Radiesse injected under my eyes 8 1/2 months ago. (Biggest mistake of my life!!!!!!) One eye continues to have a large nodule (pea-sized, tear drop shaped) that does not seem to be going away. I have had a series of steroid injections, but the nodule remains almost the same size. Will the nodule eventually go away on its own? If so, when? Should it be getting gradually smaller each month? (it's not!) At what point should I consider surgical intervention? Please Help!!

Doctor Answers (13)

Radiesse should be avoided in the lower eyelid thin skin

+1

The nodules of RAdiesse may be present for as much as two years. Expect reduction in size with time.  Surgical removal could be traumatic and leave indentations especially as more collagen is produced as a response to the filler being present. Some might say to remove the product sooner to decrease the trauma of removal and others may say that there won't be much change between 9 months and two years in the ease of removal.


Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Radiesse

+1

Not that this helps you now, but Radiesse is not appropriate, in my opinion, for the area under your eye.  This is a difficult area to fill and requires a different type of filler, like Restylane.  I would continue massage up to a year then consider excision, another option would be to try laser resurfacing in hopes that the heat could dissolve it- not a sure thing, but might be worth a shot.

Melanie L. Petro, MD
Alabama Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Radiesse

+1

I do not use Radiesse under the eyes as nodule formation has been reported.  If it is a Radiesse nodule, it should dissipate with time, but you need to see a board certified specialist for proper evaluation and treatment.  

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Rdiesse Nodule Under Eye

+1

Radiesse is not approved for use around the eyes, because it is thick and the skin is very thin. Unlike hyaluronic acid, it cannot be dissolved with Hyaluronidase. At this point, your best option is surgical removal. I would recommend removal by a plastic surgeon who has experience with blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery), who can minimize scarring.

Karen Vaniver, MD
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Nodules After Radiesse Under Eyes

+1

All good feedback from the panel members.  Being that you mentioned already undergoing several steroid injections with no value, it would not make sense to continue with this option.  If the nodule is palpable but not visible (only felt by touch) you may want to see if this improves with time as the product degrades.  If this is not an acceptable option, surgical excision should then be considered.

In our view, the use of Radiesse in the tear trough (under eye area) carries more potential risks or negative outcomes vs. benefits.  Because there is always a possibility of a negative outcome even with skilled technique, using a smooth gel filler is a better option. 

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Radiesse Nodules Under the Eyelid: Break it up with injections

+1

Radiesse is a calcium based filler which can be classified as a volumizer and a biostimulator since it does encourage your body to produce collagen in the area of injection. Unfortunately, it is less forgiving than hyaluronic acid based fillers which are smooth gels that can be dissolved. Your options for making this nodule, which I hope it is a Radiesse nodule would be light massage, injection with saline to break up the nodule, or surgical removal. The injection with saline can help to break up the nodule and usually your body can resorb it. Steroids usually cause more harm than good. The saline injections are very easily tolerated and combined with massage can make this lump go away.

I hope this helps.

Dr. Trussler

Andrew P. Trussler, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Nodule

+1

i would continute to inject and massage for a yr or two ..if no improvment , simple excision should leave minimal scar..Gl

Michael K. Kim, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Nodule under eye from Radiesse injections

+1

  Radiesse is meant to be placed within the fatty layers and the lower eyelid has no such layer.  Radiesse should not be injected there, IMHO as it's likely to cause lumps, bumps and nodules.  I have treated patients, who have had Radiesse injected there (done elsewhere), with Juvederm or Perlane..depending on nodule location...to soften and feather out the effects until the Radiesse dissolves...which it always does.  Radiesse can last a year or longer and I would not inject steroid, that can cause atrophy of the surrounding tissues, but waity until it dissolves on its own.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

A Non-Surgical Option For Treating CaHA Nodules

+1

Radiesse can be used in the tear trough, but this needs to be carefully and sparingly placed deep over the bone by an experienced injector. Even then, there are more risks associated with irregularity when compared to the hyaluronic acid gel fillers which are more forgiving.

Before proceeding to surgical intervention you may want to have your physician try a treatment which involves “injection of sterile water (or saline) and massage”.

Best wishes. Kenneth Dembny

Kenneth Dembny, II, MD
Milwaukee Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Radiesse under eye

+1

Radiesse is an excellent filler but, i don;t recommend it for tear trough issues. It should be use deep as in cheek enhancement or severe nasolabial folds.Try massage and heat before going to surgery>

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.