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Is Radiesse Ok to Use After Lower Bleph to Raise Cheeks to Fill in Tear Troughs and Correct Asymmetry? (photo)

my dr. wants to use radiesse filler after my lower bleph has left indents between myeyelids and cheek and they seem more assymetrical than ever. what is your opinion of radiesse for this use?

Doctor Answers (6)

Is Radiesse Ok to Use After Lower Bleph to Raise Cheeks to Fill in Tear Troughs and Correct Asymmetry?

+1

Radiesse is a great filler to build and contour the cheek due to loss of volume. Although in your case, you can certainly benefit from injecting Restylane to the tear troughs, this filler is a lot smoother to be applied under the eyes to provide a soft, natural look

Best regards 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 238 reviews

Tear trough treatment choices

+1

Personally, I would inject Belatero, a newer hyaluronic acid filler. Radiesse is better for the cheeks and i would not put in in the skin thin around the eyelids.

Good luck to you!

Beverly Johnson, MD
Silver Spring Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Re: Is Radiesse Ok to Use After Lower Bleph to Raise Cheeks to Fill in Tear Troughs and Correct Asymmetry? (photo)

+1

I do like to use Radiesse to augment the cheeks; however, I do not recommend it for the tear trough or under eye area. The skin around the eyes is very thin, and Radiesse is a thick filler better suited for other areas of the face. If you wish to augment the under eye area following a blepharoplasty procedure, I would first wait until the swelling has completely resolved. Rather than Radiesse, I would recommend a hyaluronic acid (HA) based filler such as Juvederm. HA fillers are smoother and more malleable, allowing for a better result in the under eye area when compared to Radiesse, which has been known on occasion to cause lumps. Furthermore, should you not be happy with the outcome of the HA filler there is an enzyme that can be injected to dissolve the product. This is not an option with Radiesse.

Joseph Serota, MD
Aurora Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Radiesse should not be used under the eyes

+1

Radiesse is an excellent product, and is excellent for cheek augmentation. However, it is not appropriate for the thin lower eyelid area. Restylane is a better option for this area. You may want to combine the two products for an optimal look.  

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Is Radiesse Ok to Use After Lower Bleph to Raise Cheeks to Fill in Tear Troughs and Correct Asymmetry?

+1

 I like Radiesse and have used it many, many times for facial shaping and sculpting however, it's too thick for the thin lower eyelid area and is not recommended in areas that don't have a significant fatty tissue layer.  It looks like the lower eyelids are still healing form the surgery which is typical for up to 3 months after lower eyelid surgery.  It might be best to wait that period of time before having any log-term filler injected into the area which can create lumps and bumps itself.  If after 3 months these indentations remain, IMHO, you'd have two choices.

  1. Have Perlane, Restylane or Juvederm placed to soften those indentations.
  2. Do number 1 above and have the cheeks augmented with Perlane or Cheek Implants as they appear to be quite flat.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Radiesse for Cheek Augmentation

+1

I like Radiesse for cheek augmentation, but I do not recommend it in the lower eyelid area.  So as long as your doctor is experienced in injecting Radiesse and stays more in the cheek than in the eyelid area, it can be a very nice filler for correcting asymmetries and restoring volume. 

Channing R. Barnett, MD
New York Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.