Straight Nose on an Asymmetrical Face?

i have a deviated septum but i dont ever recall having broken my nose. I believe that I was born with it because I've realized that my entire face isn't aligned: the left side of my jaw is longer than the right side, i have one eye higher than the other ( i can only see this from one side), my question is: can i have my nose made straight if my face is assymetrical? my nose is quite deviated from my left side(longer side of jaw) but seems more normal on the shorter side of the face.

Doctor Answers (11)

Rhinoplasty to straighten nose on asymmetric face

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Rhinoplasty can be performed asymmetrically to give more symmetry to the nose and facial features. Just be cognizant that there are many different facial asymmetries and that the nose must balance with all of them. Look for a very experienced rhinoplasty surgeon who has performed as rhinoplasties so as to deal with any facial and nasal asymmetries.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Acheiving perfect symmetry after nose surgery

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You have asked a great question, since the topic of symmetry comes up all the time.

My general answer is if God and or 5 billion years of evolution cannot produce perfect symmetry in our face and bodies, a patient should not expect perfect symmetry with 3-4 hours of surgery!

I am glad you have noticed the asymmetry in your face because it will affect your nose, if one side of your face is flatter than the other side, it will affect your final result.

Having said that, I have performed many rhinoplasties, and as long as the patient has realistic expectations, you will pleased with the result.  My only advise is to choose a board certified plastic surgeon or ENT surgeon with an interest in COSMETIC rhinoplasty, and look at before and after photos to see if you like the "style" of the surgeon.

Best of luck.

Michael A. Jazayeri, MD
Santa Ana Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Straight nose with Asymmetrical Face

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Your nose can be made straight despite the surrounding asymmetrical facial structures. Asymmetry is always present, although yours may be more severe. Perfect symmetry is never a goal, but discuss with your consultant. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Nasal Symmetry in an Asymmetric Face with Rhinoplasty

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Facial and nasal asymmetry is very common. Everyone has one part of the face that is a little different from the other side. Asymmetry is more noticeable in the nose, since it sits right in the middle of the face. A deviated septum is commonly associated with a crooked or twisted nose, and other facial asymmetry. Patients may have a deviated septum simply from natural nasal development, and not from nasal injury or broken nose. Rhinoplasty surgeons look at the eyes, lips, chin, cheeks, and entire face, in addition to the nose.

A plastic surgeon can help make the nose straighter. However, perfect symmetry is never guaranteed. Speak with a rhinoplasty surgeon to help determine appropriate options for you.

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Straightening a nose

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No nose is perfectly straight. I always tell patients that I usually can make the nose straighter, but I can not make it perfectly straight.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

A nose can appear straight despite facial asymmetry

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All faces show a degree of asymmetry which is essential to 'looking normal'. If you can't believe it, just try to take a frontal photo of anyone, and print one copy 'flipped' and put together the two right halves. Perfect symmetry just doesn't work, the picture will be recognizable but will look 'wrong'. Concerning noses, very many of us will have a degree of sepal deviation, and the bridge of the nose will tend to follow the sepal curve and cause the nose to appear slightly crooked. Rhinoplasty is able to straighten the nose to give visual balance despite the facial asymmetry. Remember, not a perfectly straight nose, just one that appears straight on your face. Computer imaging can help you understand the look, and give you confidence about the end result.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Straightening a crooked nose

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It is not so much that your surgeon will achieve a straight nose as they are more likely to make it appear less crooked.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Straight nose on asymmetrical face.

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Your situation is quite common. See an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon and he will give you the pros/cons of doing the nose different ways.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Deviated noses and Facial Asymmetry

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The situation you describe is not uncommon. There have been numerous publications of late showing an association between facial asymmetry and nasal deviation. Depending on the amount of facial asymmetry, the nose may or may not be fully corrected: it has to start between your eyes and end at the midpont of your upper lip. That beting said, the amount of deviation correction can be quite robust. I developed the Foundation Rhinoplasty to address situations such as yours. A critical factor is to make sure your surgeon knows extended septoplasty techniques. Without them, the chance of persistent deviations is quite high. All the best

Richard W. Westreich, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Straight

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A nose can always be made straighter - but a little asymetry give you character and your normal look. If diesired, it usually can be made straighter than it is now.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.