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Question about internal sutures after MOHS surgery? (photo)

It has been about two months and my surgery site was looking great. I noticed what looked like a scab that didn't go away. Then it started protruding out more, it is a dark piece of something. I tried to pull on it and it didn't go anywhere. Now my site is red and swollen and hot To touch. I am not sure if it is a suture or what it is. Could y'all describe what a suture would look like? I've seen them before but was confused bc this seems too thick.

Doctor Answers (3)

Possible spitting suture

+1

I would recommend that you see your Mohs surgeon to have the site evaluated. It does appear from the image to possibly be a spitting suture--there is one tiny pinpoint central depression and surrounding redness. If that is indeed what you have, the doctor can gently remove this small deep suture that is extruding outwardly and if needed, also inject some steroid to help reduce inflammation.


Seattle Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Sutures can sometimes become irritating after Mohs surgery repair

+1

Its unclear what is going on based on the very blurry photo that you posted - in general terms, Mohs surgery removes a skin cancer and then the wound is repaired using adjacent tissues or a skin graft. I typically use absorbable sutures beneath the surface of the skin to reduce tension on the epithelial portion of the wound repair. These sutures can sometimes 'spit' to the surface or become infected.

Scott C. Sattler, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Spitting suture

+1

based on what you describe it might be a spitting stitch which happens occasionally. Go in to see you Mohs surgeon and they can easily evaluate it.

Omar Ibrahimi, MD
Stamford Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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