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Will Putting Continuous Pressure on My Nasal Bone Induce Bone Resoprtion?

will putting continuous pressure on ur nasal bone induce bone resorption? may this reduce a small bump on the nose?

Doctor Answers (9)

Molding the nose.

+1

Although it may seem to make sense, I am not aware of a study which has shown this. Depite this, there are a proliferation of products on the market that claim to mold the nose.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Pressure to Reduce Nasal Bone

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If the bump is secondary to a convexity of the nasal bone, pressure will do nothing to reduce that bone. The only thing you may accomplish is irritating the overlying skin.
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Continuous pressure will not induce nasal bone resorption

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It is impossible to produce bone absorption from just single finger pressure. A small bump on the nose can be easily removed by rasping the bridge and if it is a small enough bump, the nasal bone will not have to be broken.

Web reference: http://www.seattlefacial.com

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Putting Pressure on your Nose will not Reduce a Nasal Hump

+1

Hi Amman in Amman, 11,

No. Continuous external pressure on top of the nose will not reduce a hump. However, one could imagine that if someone wears a specially designed mask continuously for years, then yes the nose and face will change shape gradually over time. Neck, feet, and other body parts have slowly been altered by applying pressure over time. In practice, only surgical or nonsurgical rhinoplasty could realistically reshape a nasal hump. Speak with a rhinoplasty surgeon to help determine appropriate options for you. Best of luck.

Dr. Chaboki

Web reference: http://www.potomacplasticsurgery.com/facial-plastic-surgery/rhinoplasty.cfm

Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Putting Continuous Pressure on My Nasal Bone Induce Bone Resoprtion

+1

Interesting question. Yes it is possible but extremely unlikely to occur. Where did you come up with this idea? The amount of continual pressure needed to be exerted on the nasal bones and the length of time is not realistic therefore I doubt you could cause nasal bone resorption. 

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Instead of Massage, Consider a Non-Surgical Solution to your Bump

+1

Consult with an expert who does nearly only noses. Ask about " fillers". It may be appropriate if your bump is indeed very small.

Today's fillers are great. Less cost than surgery; no down time and you get an instant result.

Leave the massage work to physical therapists.

Best wishes to everyone in one of my favorite cities, Amman.

-Robert Kotler, MD, FACS  in Beverly Hills

Web reference: http://www.robertkotlermd.com

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Nasal bone pressure

+1

Putting pressure on the nose will really not do anything. If you have a small bump, surgery really is the only option to remove it.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Reducing the size of a nasal hump

+1

The short answer to this question is that it is unlikely to help this process. However, if you have had a previous rhinoplasty, then yes continuous pressure on an area of fullness or small hump can often reduce the size of the bump. I hope this information helps.

Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Continuous Pressure on Nose Will Not Induce Bone Resorption of Bump

+1

Hi  Amman,

The very short answer to your question whether pressure on the nose will make a small bump go away is NO.  Surgery is the only way to remove a nasal bump.  It can be camouflaged by using a small amount of injectable filler above and/or below the bump.  Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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