Should You Be Put Under when Having Reconstrution on Lower Eye Due to Ectropion?

Can it be ectropion beceause you have to resupport the ligament? or is that too complicated to do while awake?

Doctor Answers (9)

Typically, twilight anesthesia is the most appropriate.

+3

This is a surgery where is can be very comfortable done under local anesthesia but most patients prefer some IV sedation so they are less aware.  The level can be very light because the local anesthetic is quite effective.  Some of the drugs used for this purpose actually block the ability to form memories of what took place during surgery.  These drugs are very short acting and much more pleasant than having a general anesthesia.


Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Ectropion repair and most eyelid sugery achievable under light sedation

+3

A person's overall medical condition is always considered when deciding upon the anesthesia / sedation.

Most eyelid surgeries in adults can be accomplished under a light sedation with local anesthesia.  Some eyelid surgeries are able to be done in the office under local  depending on the patient, surgeon, and the office.

Only very rarely must an adult patient be under general anesthesia for an eyelid surgery.  Some examples would include: patients with certain movement disorders,  patients with severe language or cognitive issues,  or rare patients with extreme anxiety.

Hope this helps.

 

Mark Lucarelli, MD, FACS

Madison, WI

Mark J. Lucarelli, MD
Madison Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Anesthesia depends on the level of complexity

+3

If your doctor is planning on performing a lower eyelid canthoplasty with scar release and a spacer graft from your mouth, I think general anesthesia both for the patient and the physician could be easier for both. If you are healthy and your risks are low, there is nothing wrong with general anesthesia. It depends on the comfort level of the surgeon and the complexity of your case. Have a candid talk with your surgeon and he will explain his reasons. There is no wright or wrong answer. Just whatever is best for you and your surgeon.

All the best,

Dr. Lille

Sean T. Lille, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Eyelid surgery in an adult never requres general anesthesia.

+3

In most cases I do it with light intravenous sedation, but some patients who need a simple lateral tarsal strip procedure to shorten and reconnect the tendon can be done in an office minor surgery room with local injection of anesthesia only.

Jeffrey Schiller, MD
Staten Island Oculoplastic Surgeon
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Anesthesia for Eyelid surgery

+2

Very rarley is general anesthesia needed for eyelid surgery. Often the consious sedation or twillight anesthesia is enough to put most patients at ease.Local anesthetic is then used to dull any further pain. 

Marshall T. Partington, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

Eyelid surgery and anesthesia

+2

The first question you have to ask is all of yourself. Is this something I would like to do while awake. Most surgeons will offer at least some form of oral sedation and I would think the majority will give you the option of doing it under "twilight sleep" anesthesia. The only thing you will not hear would be a full general anesthesia. Hope this helps

Sherwood Baxt, MD
Paramus Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Anesthesia with ectropion repair

+2

Ectropion surgery can be done with local anesthetic only, but most commonly performed with IV sedation "twilight sleep". The use of general anesthesia for ectropion repair is mainly used for very difficult or severe cases.

Good luck!

John H. Hunts MD, PhD
Eugene Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Ectropion surgery anesthesia

+1

Most eyelid surgeries, including ectropion surgery, are best done under local anesthesia, with or without sedation.  It is safer, easier, and with quicker recovery.  It is extremely rare for me to perform ectropion surgery under general anesthesia, namely kids less than 10 years old. Consult an oculoplastic surgeon.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Anesthesia for Ectropion Surgery

+1

Peace01,

Not all ectropion surgeries are the same.  However, standard ectropion surgery is fairly straight forward and should not require general anesthesia.  Your general health will play a role in what is the best approach for you.  Although most patients are able to tolerate standard ectropion surgery with local anesthesia, I think it is a more comfortable experience for the patient to have this procedure with IV sedation performed by an anesthesiologist.

Best wishes,

Dr. McCracken

Michael McCracken, MD
Lone Tree Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.