Pumped my Nose After Rhinoplasty

please help i has rhinoplasty 2 weeks ago..and my loser partner has hit me 2time in the nose..2 days in a row..the first time he kicked a bouncy blow up ball to my head..(dumbass)..that hurt a little but went away..and then again last nyt he accidently elbowed me..im in pain..it feels to be in the inside of my left nose hole, about half a pinky finger in on the left side of the wall..and also if i press down around my nose on that side it hurts..i am so scared.hav i damaged it?

Doctor Answers (8)

Trauma after Rhinoplasty

+2

Precautions need to be put in place to prevent future trauma. If your partner needs to live in the dog house while you recover then encourage it. In the meantime, you will need to contact your surgeon for a physical examination to determine what if any damage your partner has caused.


West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

HELP

+2

Get safe first and do not allow any further trauma to nose or self.  Follow-up with your surgeon today and follow the advice of medical personnel.

Robert Shumway, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Nasal Trauma after Rhinoplasty

+2

I think you should find someplace else to live until your nose heals following your surgery. You need to see your surgeon to be evaluated by your surgeon ASAP. It is not something we can evaluate and treat on the web.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Concerned with damage to nose after rhinoplasty.

+2

There is no way to tell if any problem exists without at least a photo but the gold standard is a face to face examination.  I would return to your surgeon and have an examination done.  Your surgeon knows what your pre operative and post operative appearance was and is in the best position to evaluate you.

Jeffrey M. Darrow, MD
Boston Plastic Surgeon
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Nasal Trauma After Rhinoplasty

+1

Dear Catherine,

I am sorry that you have been subjected to accidental nasal trauma.

At 2 weeks post-op, your nose remains fragile and you need to protect it by all means otherwise you will risk to damage the results of your surgery.

With that perspective, it is hard to tell you if damage has been done to your nose without physical examination.

I recommend that you consult with your surgeon who knows the full details of your surgery and who can physically examine your nose in and out to make sure that you are within the "safe zone".

I hope this helps.

Thank you for your inquiry.

Dr. Sajjadian

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 115 reviews

Bumps to the nose following rhinoplasty.

+1

In order to protect your investment, all reasonable measures need to be taken in order to prevent any physical force being applied to the nose for 4 to 6 weeks following rhinoplasty.  At this point it would be reasonable to be apart from your partner for some time.  I would get in to see your surgeon ASAP to see if any damage has been done.

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS, FRCSC.

 

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Rhinoplasty post-op issues

+1
If you are concerned about your nose, you shoudl contact your surgeon to be evaluated just in case there wsa trauma.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Trauma after rhinoplasty

+1

First 6 weeks after rhinoplasty the nasal bones are fairly unstable, so it does not take a lot of force to traumatize or displace them.  Even though your two incidents most likely did not cause any significant damage, it is still a good idea to get evaluated by your surgeon. And please be more careful in the future.

Alexander Ovchinsky, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.