Pulmonary Edema After Septorhinoplasty

I'm 20, last year I did a septorhinoplasty under general anesthesia (propofol, esmeron and sufentanyl were used) and after the extubation I had a light desaturation (<95%) and then a pulmonary edema. I spent one night in intensive care unit and then the situation resolved. I would like to know if some doctor have had a similar experience in his career and if so why it may occurs? (of course I'm talking about cases of young and healthy people). Sorry for my bad english, I'm from italy. Thanks.

Doctor Answers (3)

Complication After Rhinoplasty

+2

Dr. Aldea has proved a nice answer to your question.  I have not seen personally in my practice but there are various literature reports concerning negative pressure pulmonary edema.  This drives home the point of the importance of have procedures performed by highly qualified providers (board certified plastic surgeons and anesthesiologist, etc.) in an accredited facility.  I am glad your recovery has gone well.  Enjoy your newly contoured nose.

Dr. ES


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Pulmonary edema after rhinoplasty.

+2

Dr Aldea has given the answer to why this occurs. It is very rare and in more than 35 years of rhinoplasty, I have never seen this.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Pulmonary Edema (Fluid flooding of Lungs) after uneventful Surgery

+2

Regarding: "Pulmonary Edema After Septorhinoplasty
I'm 20, last year I did a septorhinoplasty under general anesthesia (propofol, esmeron and sufentanyl were used) and after the extubation I had a light desaturation (<95%) and then a pulmonary edema. I spent one night in intensive care unit and then the situation resolved. I would like to know if some doctor have had a similar experience in his career and if so why it may occurs? (of course I'm talking about cases of young and healthy people). Sorry for my bad english, I'm from italy. Thanks
."

The condition you are referring do is uncommon (0.1%) and is termed Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema (NPPE). Unfortunately it happens when a patient wakes up rapidly and takes a deep breath (causing high negative chest pressures) against either a closed airway or spasm of the airway resulting in fluid flooding of the lungs. Although this resolves rapidly it is worrisome and needs to be treated in a hospital setting.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

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