Can a pronounced frontalis (from injury) be corrected? (Photo)

I was injured, now one side of my frontalis is pronounced and has a bump. Can the bump be removed or lessened? Attached is an x-ray, in which you can see the bump. Thank you

Doctor Answers (4)

Forehead reconstruction

+1
The x-ray you posted shows a pronounced frontal sinus. This can create a pronounced forehead protuberance that can be unattractive.  Two to four times each week I reconstruct the forehead for precisely this problem.  The procedure takes approximately 90 minutes and has an excellent safety profile as I've published in a number of papers.

If you are interested in learning more I'd suggest researching FFS forehead procedures.

Best of luck


Boston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Forehead correction

+1
Most discrepancies and differences can be corrected sometimes with local anesthesia. It is difficult to determine exactly from the photo.

Edward J. Domanskis, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Forehead bump

+1
A CT is a much better imaging study to compare the two sides. The X-ray you provide doesn't display well but you have a very well pneumatized frontal sinus. If the injury is recent and the bump on the same side then hematoma likely and will resolve. If bump on the side opposite the injury then may have depressed frontal sinus fracture. Recommend seeing facial plastic surgeon with experience in facial trauma

Mark Loury, MD
Fort Collins Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Frontalis Injury

+1
When was your injury and do you have other imaging studies such as a CT or MRI?  With appropriate workup, this area can likely be improved and/or fixed.  Please consult with a board certified specialist in the face with a background in head and neck surgery who can assist you with this.  

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.