Do Lasers Cause Filler to Degrade Faster?

Do ProFractional lasers breakdown fillers? I am getting ready to have a laser treatment in one week and I am wondering if I should wait to do filler?

Doctor Answers (3)

Laser and Fillers - Which first?

+2

We perform the laser treatment first regardless if it is an ablative procedure or a non-ablative laser treatment. Most manufacturers of filler products have suggested that heat (ex: tanning booths, excessive UV exposure, lasers) can degrade the product much quicker...not good if you were the one that just invested in a syringe of product. We recommend doing the filler procedure 2 weeks after an ablative procedure (if completely healed). Non-ablative (no downtime) lasers usually may be done before the injection procedure or one week after the filler placement.


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Depends on the depth of fillers

+1
OK, fillers can be used to volumise different areas, and can be placed very superficially ( such as upper lip lines, and also acne scars), or  they can be placed in areas such as the mid face. Generally in this area, fillers are deep and way out of the reach of lasers. Lasers such as Sciton Profactional only penetrate at maximum 1.5 mm, but with the heat transfer, may reach down to say 3 mm. Most fillers in the mid cheek area are placed much deeper than this. 

As a rule I always laser first, then fill second. Makes sense as laser can remove wrinkle on the upper lip, and hence reduce the need for filler in that area. Does that make sense?

Hope this helps, 

Dr Davin Lim 
Laser and cosmetic dermatologist
Brisbane, AUSTRALIA

Davin Lim, MBBS, FACD
Brisbane Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Laser first

+1

The heat of laser can detiorate fillers so you may want to do the laser first and do the fillers after you heal from the laser.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

You might also like...

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.