Ask a doctor

Problems with Tummy Tuck and Weight?

It seems as though since my tummy tuck I'm having more difficulty with my weight. Is this normal? My breasts and arms seem to gain weight easily now. Also, If I get lipo of the hips, is this going to make weight gain elsewhere even more probable? I don't want to get the lipo if that coupled with the prior tummy tuck is going to make it even more difficult to maintain my weight. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Doctor Answers (6)

Abdominoplasty does not make patients more prone to weight gain.

+1

An abdominoplasty will not predispose you to gain or lose weight. Most abdominoplasty patients lose weight after the operation for psychologic reasons.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Weight gain after abdominoplasty

+1

My guess is that your tummy was your weight barometer meaning that if you could not zip up your jeans, you cut down on your calories until you could zip them up.  Once the tummy is trimmer and the jeans zip up easily, you no longer have this reminder and the calories creep up and the weight creeps up.

You need the help of a weight loss and maintenance program that get you and keep you on track for a healthy future.  My blog has a few suggestions.

Good luck to you.

Lisa L. Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Weight gains and where it goes after body contouring

+1

You are correct in that weight gains will go elsewhere if you cannot control your weight.  If you cannot, do not have liposuction as it would only transfer your problem from one spot to another.  If you can maintain your weight, go for it and you should be happy with your results.  Good luck.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

You might also like...

Weight control after a tummy tuck

+1

It sounds like you might need a trainer or nutritionist to get you on the right track.  Liposuction is great for contouring the abdominal area, but I would not recommend using it as a weight loss method.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Tummy Tuck and Weight Control Concerns?

+1

Thank you for the question.  I do not believe that your previous tummy tuck surgery has any direct association with your “difficulty with weight” concerns.  Sometimes when patients reach a “plateau” with their diet and exercise program, I suggest consultation with their internist ( to rule out medical problems that may make weight loss difficult),  personal trainers, and/or nutritionists.

 Certainly best to try the above “consultants” recommendations before considering additional surgery, including liposuction surgery.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 709 reviews

Weight after tummy tuck and lipo

+1

This is a great question and is frequently asked at consultations. There is a false belief that if you have lipo or a tummy tuck that the fat will "just go somewhere else". First, liposuction nor tummy tucks change your metabolism.  So you will still gain and lose weight the same way you do before surgery. However, if the skin and fat has been removed from certain areas, like your tummy, thighs and butt, than the weight you gain will make other areas larger. If you weigh the same now that you did before surgery, than you have essentially gained weight, since by definition you should weigh less after having had skin and fat removed from your surgery. Surgery is not a substitute for a healthy diet and regular exercise. It merely changes your shape at whatever weight you happen to be at the time of surgery. For the longest most stable results I like my patients to be at a weight that they feel like they can maintain relatively easily. 

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.