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1 week PO, two "pouches" appeared to either side of midline under my jaw. Does anyone know what would have caused this?

I had a lower face and neck lift with platysma plication. About 1 week after the procedure, these two "pouches" appeared to either side of midline under my jaw. They were filled with fluid then but now are just loose skin. The left side is worse than the right. Does anyone know what would have caused this and/or what could be done to remedy it?

Doctor Answers (3)

1 week PO, two "pouches" appeared to either side of midline under my jaw. Does anyone know what would have caused this?

+1

  I would return to your surgeon for an exam and evaluation as he or she is familiar with your course thus far and the specifics of the operation.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Pouches after neck or facelift under the jaw may be seroma or in adequate skin tightening

+1

Thank you for your question. Be sure to consult your plastic surgeon as soon as possible. Your description that they were fluid-filled suggest that they may have been seromas, a collection of fluid following your facelift. However if they are present many weeks after the facelift they could represent skin stretched by seroma or in adequate tightening of the cheek and neck skin following a midline platysma repair. In either event you need to see your plastic surgeon

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Pouches after face lift and neck lift

+1

They could be one of two things:

  1. Remnant fat after liposuction with some skin bunching
  2. Prominent submandibular glands

Or 3. The combination of one and two.

Allowing healing to progress and a physical examination will determine the origin of these pouches as well as the best remedy.

Frank P. Fechner, MD
Worcester Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

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